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Joel
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Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ Empty
MessageSujet: Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ   Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ EmptyVen 10 Oct 2014 - 9:04

www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/10/evo-morales-riding-high-before-bolivia-election                                                 Depi plis ke 2 SYÈK ;yon bann NÈG al ETIDYE an FRANS epi yo tounen e yo bezwen DIRIJE peyi an ,paske sipozèman yo KONNEN.
Anpil NÈG sa yo tounen pi SÒT pase PANYEN PÈSE.
Epi yo vin anfonse peyi an pi FÒ lan LABIM.
Mwen pa kont NÈG pran 2 ,3 DOKTORA ,plis EDIKASYON pi BON,men sa pa bay PRÈV ke yo ka dirije.
Mwen di sa pou mwen ILISTRE sa ki pral pase lan BOLIVI ak ELEKSYON LIB e LIBÈ.
Yo di ke omwens yon MIRAK ,EVO MORALES ap pran yon 3zyèm MANDA.
Misye gen 41 PWEN DAVANS lan KONPETITÈ ki pi pwòch li an ;si w ka rele l konsa.

EVO MORALES ,ansyen VANDÈ FÈY COCA,yo ize pou fè KOKAYIN ,ki pa rive pi lwen ke ekivalan 3 zyèm SEGONDÈ nou an.
Misye chanje BOLIVI.Se pou nou di tou ke si se pa t pou BREZIL ,ETAZINI te jete misye depi LONTAN!

Evo Morales heading for third-term landslide in thriving Bolivia
Former coca farmer 41 points ahead in the polls thanks to sound economy and sharing of mineral wealth

3)
Bolivia-campaign poster
A billboard in support of Bolivia’s president, Evo Morales, before the election on 12 October. Photograph: Juan Karita/AP
Above La Paz, gleaming red, green and yellow cable cars glide across the sky. Outside the southern city of Potosí, a formerly long-dormant smelting plant is turning out lead ingots. In the eastern state of Santa Cruz, a new project is bringing natural gas for cooking into more homes.

Bolivia is riding an economic high partly based on greater state control of natural resources and an unusually long period of political stability – not what critics expected when Evo Morales, coca farmer, unionist and the country’s first indigenous president, was elected in 2005.

Now Morales seems poised to win a resounding election victory – his third – that will take his presidency through 2020 and make him the longest-serving leader in Bolivian history.

Polls show him at 59 points, 41 points ahead of his closest competitor, thanks to the endorsement by labour and campesino organisations, and the support of many middle-class urban citizens. “Most people are voting for Evo because there is change,” said law student Marinalda Jemio.

Cable cars over La Paz
Cable cars in the fog as people commute between La Paz and El Alto, Bolivia. Photograph: Juan Karita/AP
Historically, Bolivia’s vast reserves of natural resources created great wealth for a small few. Under Morales, that has started to change. Investment in the transport system, cash grants for schoolchildren, women and the elderly, and a scheme to bring natural gas for cooking into more homes have led many voters to feel that Bolivia’s mineral wealth is finally benefiting its impoverished people.

In 2002, when Morales made his first bid for president, the US ambassador warned Bolivians against electing a man who rose to national prominence as the leader of the country’s largest coca farmers’ union. Coca has a long history of traditional uses in Bolivia but is also the raw material needed to make cocaine.

“Morales certainly disappointed conservative critics abroad and at home who claimed his tenure would lead to economic collapse, social chaos, unbridled cocaine production, violence and abandonment by the international community,” said Kathryn Ledebur, director of policy analyst group the Andean Information Network.

“He took almost everyone by surprise with sound, homespun macroeconomic policies, and an ability to confront US political pressure without immediate dramatic adverse consequences.”

But as well as confounding his critics, Morales has also disappointed some of his supporters.

“The indigenous movement has been betrayed by this government,” said Cancio Rojas, one of the leaders of the National Council of Ayllus and Markas of Qullasuyu (Conamaq), a group of traditional governing bodies. Rojas, who was jailed and released for his role in a 2012 mining protest, said the government failed in its promises to empower indigenous peoples and protect the environment – and seeks to divide indigenous organisations that question its policies.

Morales has repeatedly pledged to give priority to the protection of Pachamama (Mother Earth) but, according to environmental activist Fabrizio Uscamayta, this has not led to concrete protections in Bolivia. “I think for us it’s painful because that [environmental management] was one of the principal points in government proposals, but sadly it’s the point that has been least accomplished,” he said.

The Bolivian constitution allows a president just two terms, but Morales’s party argued that because his first term was under the country’s former constitution, which was replaced in 2009, he can legitimately stand again. The constitutional court agreed, and public opinion seems to support the move. In this respect Morales has a great deal of company in Latin America when it comes to legally justifying extending a presidency, including Alberto Fujimori in Peru, Rafael Correa in Ecuador, and, perhaps most famously, Hugo Chávez in Venezuela.

Javier Pari, who works in a La Paz bank, says Morales will win the election not because of unreserved endorsement of his government, but because the opposition has failed to generate excitement. “There is no new political figure who has come out to say: ‘We’re different, we’re going to form a new kind of government’,” he said. “So even if people are against it [a third term], it’s going to happen.”


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Joel
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Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ   Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ EmptySam 11 Oct 2014 - 11:16

EDWIDGE DANTICAT ki se AYISYEN AMERIKEN limenm te pran MAC ARTHUR GENIUS PRIZE.
Pou MOUN ki pa fin twò MATON ann ANGLE ,yo ka rekonèt mo ""GENIUS"" lan ki vle di ""GÉNIE"" ""JENI"".

Pri sa a se te 500 MIL DOLA AMERIKEN epi sa gen KÈK ANE de sa EDWIDGE DANTICAT te rekonèt kòm youn lan 20 PI BON JÈN EKRIVEN AMERIKEN yo.
Se lan yon peyi de plis ke 300 MILYON MOUN ki 5 FWA POPILASYON la FRANS.
EDWIDGE DANTICAT ,se yon MOUN SENP ke mwen SI ke si MOUN ap pale de ""le savwa"" jan gen NÈG wè l ,l ap pran w a grap!
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Joel
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Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ   Men le SAVWA-Bann BLOFÈ EmptyMar 14 Oct 2014 - 16:19

Wi men ""BON SAVWA"",savwa de NÈG tankou EVO MORALES.
Yon NÈG ki pa TRÈT lan FASON GERARD PIERRE CHARLES ,SAUVEUR PIERRE ETIENNE elt..ki te al lan MARE KONPLO ak ENPERYALIS yo si nou kwè yon MOUN tankou JEB SPRAGUE jan l di l lan LIV li an ""PARAMILITARIES AND THE ASSAULT ON DEMOCRACY IN HAITI"".
Atik sa a di ke EVO MORALES fè le KONTRÈ ke sa BANK MONDYAL ak FWON MONETÈ ENTÈNASYONAL di l pou l fè e li di yo ""ALE O DYAB""
BOLIVI ap SIGE e SIBELGWENN ki ap di ke AYITI pa pre pou DEMOKRASI yo .
Se an BOLIVI yo te fè plis KOUDETA lan AMERIK lan .Se plis ke 140 KOUDETA ;petèt plis ke 2 ou  3 FWA plis KOUDETA ki fèt ann AYITI:

Evo Morales has proved that socialism doesn’t damage economies
Bolivia’s re-elected president has dumbfounded critics in Washington, the World Bank and the IMF. There are lessons for Britain’s left here
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Ellie Mae O'Hagan
Ellie Mae O'Hagan
theguardian.com, Tuesday 14 October 2014 09.00 EDT
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Evo Morales campaigns for the presidency
Evo Morales in the runup for the vote at the inauguration of a thermo-electric plant in Yacuiba in September 2014. Photograph: Aizar Raldes/AFP/Getty
The socialist Evo Morales, who yesterday was re-elected to serve a third term as president of Bolivia, has long been cast as a figure of fun by the media in the global north. Much like the now deceased Hugo Chávez, Morales is often depicted as a buffoonish populist whose flamboyant denouncements of the United States belie his incompetence. And so, reports of his landslide win inevitably focused on his announcement that it was “a victory for anti-imperialism”, as though anti-US sentiment is the only thing Morales has given to Bolivia in his eight years in government.

More likely, Morales’s enduring popularity is a result of his extraordinary socio-economic reforms, which – according to the New York Times – have transformed Bolivia from an “economic basket case” into a country that receives praise from such unlikely contenders as the World Bank and the IMF – an irony considering the country’s success is the result of the socialist administration casting off the recommendations of the IMF in the first place.

According to a report by the Centre for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) in Washington, “Bolivia has grown much faster over the last eight years than in any period over the past three and a half decades.” The benefits of such growth have been felt by the Bolivian people: under Morales, poverty has declined by 25% and extreme poverty has declined by 43%; social spending has increased by more than 45%; the real minimum wage has increased by 87.7%; and, perhaps unsurprisingly, the Economic Commission on Latin America and the Caribbean has praised Bolivia for being “one of the few countries that has reduced inequality”. In this respect, the re-election of Morales is really very simple: people like to be economically secure – so if you reduce poverty, they’ll probably vote for you.

It’s true that Morales has made enemies in the White House, but this is probably less to do with rhetoric than the fact that he consistently calls for the international legalisation of the coca leaf, which is chewed as part of Bolivian culture but can also be refined into cocaine (via a truly disgusting chemical process). Before Morales was first elected, the Telegraph reported: “Decriminalisation would probably increase supply of the leaf, which is processed into cocaine, providing drug traffickers with more of the profitable illicit substance.” In fact the opposite has happened – in the past two years, coca cultivation has been falling in Bolivia. This inconvenient fact is a source of great consternation to the US government, which has poured billions of dollars into its totally ineffective and highly militaristic war on drugs in Latin America. Morales has – accurately in my view – previously implied that the war on drugs is used by the US as an excuse to meddle in the region’s politics.

Having said this, it would be dishonest to argue that Morales’s tenure has been perfect. Earlier this year the Bolivian government drew criticism from human rights groups for reducing the legal working age to 10. But what most news outlets neglected to mention is that the government was responding to a campaign from the children’s trade union, Unatsbo, which sees the change in legislation as a first step to protecting Bolivia’s 850,000 working children from the exploitation that comes with clandestine employment. Although Bolivia has made massive strides in reducing poverty, more than a million of its citizens still live on 75p a day – a legacy of the excruciating poverty of Bolivia before Morales took office.

Nevertheless, Morales must make reducing the number of child workers a priority during his third term. Not doing so will be a serious failure of his progressive project. In terms of social reforms, Morales should heed recent calls from the public advocate of Bolivia, Rolando Villena, to legalise same-sex civil unions and pave the way for equal marriage. He should also follow the lead of Uruguay’s president, José Mujica, and completely liberalise abortion, which would be a good first step to tackling the country’s high rates of maternal mortality. And Morales must also address the criticism of indigenous leaders who accuse him of failing to honour his commitments to protect indigenous people and the environment.

But however Morales uses his third term, it’s clear that what he’s done already has been remarkable. He has defied the conventional wisdom that says leftwing policies damage economic growth, that working-class people can’t run successful economies, and that politics can’t be transformative – and he’s done all of this in the face of enormous political pressure from the IMF, the international business community and the US government. In the success of Morales, important political lessons can be found – and perhaps we could all do with learning them.



www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/oct/14/evo-morales-reelected-socialism-doesnt-damage-economies-bolivia
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