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 Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.

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MessageSujet: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Lun 20 Juil 2015 - 21:23

Nou pa tande pawòl anpil sou sitiyasyon finansye Pòto Riko, men dapre sak ap sòti lan laprès chinwa, yo prèt pou deklare bankwout depi plizye mwa.
Kounyea yo genyen yon defisi 5.4 milya dola yo pakapab peye.
Menm Ayiti pa lan eta saa.
Sak pase koloni meriken saa?
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MessageSujet: Re: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Lun 20 Juil 2015 - 22:37

Oui. J'ai pensé exactement comme vous en écoutant la nouvelle. Cela va probablement apporter de l'eau au moulin du movement indépendantiste de l'île.

La République Dominicaine est en train de risquer gros. Elle pourrait payer cher pour sa politique de dénationalisation.
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MessageSujet: Re: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Mar 21 Juil 2015 - 5:44

SASAYE ak MOREAU ,bagay yo pi KONPLIKE ke sa.
NEW YORK CITY te lan menm sitiyasyon ak POTORIKO lan komansman lanne 1970s.

7.9 MILYA dola se jis pou SEVI DET lan ,paske POTORIKO dwe 72 MILYA DOLA.
Pwoblem POTORIKO genyen se ke le gen PWOBLEM POTORIKO yo jis MARE PAKET yo e yo imigre lan  main land lan.
Lontan se MOUN zafe pa bon ki te konn fe sa ,kounye an se KLAS MWAYEN lan ,MOUN ki ap peye TAKS yo.
Apre tou POTORIKO gen "world class"INIVESITE.Potoriken yo preske kolonize FLORID.Tout ZON TAMPA ak ORLANDO se yo E yo pa lwen lakay yo.
Kanta ENDEPANDANS menm ,se pa yon gwo OPSYON jounen Jodi an.Te gen yon gwo MOUVMAN ENDEPANDANS apre AMERIKEN yo te pran 3 TERITWA sa yo lan men PANYOL yo apre GE 1898 lan.
Se te KIBA,PHILIPPINES ,ak POTORIKO.
Se sel POTORIKO ki rete komETA ASOSYE.POTORIKEN te goumen pou ENDEPANDANS li tou.SE YON LOT ISTWA.
Te gen FAME ATANTA ke endepandantis kiben yo te fe sou HARRY TRUMAN ak KANPAY "TERORIS" lage BONM ke yo te fe lan NEW YORK ak ILLINOIS ...
Men yon ATIK ki eksplike yon ti kras PWOBLEM EKONOMIK ke POTORIKO ap konfwonte:

  
Puerto Rico Faces Its Creditors in Early Debt Resolution Talks
By MICHAEL CORKERYJULY 13, 2015
Inside

Supported By


Photo



A for-sale sign hangs alongside a Puerto Rican flag on a balcony in Old San Juan. Credit Joe Raedle/Getty Images 

 Monday between Puerto Rico and its creditors is any indication, restructuring the island’s $72 billion in debt could be a long process.
At that meeting, the commonwealth’s finance team said it had not yet determined how it would seek to revamp the island’s obligations.
The roughly 350 creditors, such as hedge funds and money managers, that had packed into a Park Avenue auditorium on Monday afternoon were told they would have to wait several more weeks until a working group made up of Puerto Rico political leaders came up with formal recommendations for ending the island’s fiscal crisis.
“I ask for your patience while we develop a credible plan that meets all of our stakeholders’ objectives,” Melba Acosta Febo, the president of the Government Development Bank for Puerto Rico, told the creditors gathered at Citigroup’s executive headquarters.
The meeting, which lasted more than an hour, was the first time that creditors heard directly from Puerto Rico officials since Gov. Alejandro García Padilla declared two weeks ago that the island’s debt was not payable.
Photo



Rosa Arias, listening last month as Gov. Alejandro García Padilla told Puerto Ricans that the island’s $72 billion in debt was unpayable and that they would need to sacrifice to restore financial health. Credit Joe Raedle/Getty Images
The government spent most of its presentation on Monday reiterating the bleak condition of the island’s economy and calling for drastic measures like cutting sick leave for local workers and lowering the minimum wage to jump-start hiring. It has more municipal bond debt per capita than any American state.
Anne O. Krueger, a former chief economist for the World Bank and co-author of a report on Puerto Rico’s troubles, told investors that the United States territory was caught in an unusual bind. It is not a struggling sovereign nation that can tap the International Monetary Fund, nor is it a state with voting members of Congress. Yet, she concluded that its economy had great potential and was entirely “underutilized.”
But most of the questions from creditors like Deutsche Bank’s asset management unit and Brigade Capital Management focused on details of a possible debt restructuring. Investors asked, for example, whether the restructuring would extend to the general obligation bonds, which are supposed to carry a constitutional guarantee of repayment. Much of Puerto Rico’s debt is also widely held in mutual funds or other investment accounts by individual investors on the United States mainland.
Officials said they would look at each type of bond separately, but said the designated political leaders would first need to come up with a comprehensive plan that would address not only the debt, but also ways of cutting the deficit and stimulating the island’s economy.
Commonwealth officials aimed to strike a tone of cooperation with creditors by portraying the island’s fiscal woes as a common problem that all parties needed to work together to solve.
“It is our hope that you will engage with us in an open and transparent process,” said Jim Millstein, founder of Millstein & Company, who is advising Puerto Rico.
But the meeting was a reminder of the risks of investing in government debt. Creditors are now at the mercy of commonwealth officials, who must come up with a plan that is not only fiscally practical, but politically acceptable.
Advertisement
Continue reading the main story
Advertisement
Continue reading the main story
Advertisement
Continue reading the main story
Privately, investors have expressed frustration that Mr. García Padilla’s finance team has not provided more details about a restructuring. Some have complained that Puerto Rico officials are painting an overly dark picture to drum up support in Congress for some form of federal assistance. Specifically, Puerto Rico is lobbying aggressively for a bill that would allow its public enterprises access to federal bankruptcy courts, which they do not have under the island’s status as a United States territory.
Puerto Rico officials have said that the island’s residents have shouldered most of the burden through tax increases and pension cuts, and now it is time for creditors to make concessions to cut the debt burden. Mr. García Padilla has said publicly that the government may seek to postpone debt payments for a number of years and that all forms of the island debt could be restructured.
Citigroup, which hosted Monday’s meeting, has been hired as the lead broker-dealer for what the Puerto Rico government called “liability management transactions.” And while its government kept quiet about its restructuring strategy, there had been recent signals about how the process might unfold.
Last week, the Government Development Bank announced in a regulatory filing that it may seek the purchase of billions of dollars of its outstanding debt at a discount. The regulatory filing provided few details, but people briefed on the matter said the repurchase proposal could involve the development bank buying its bonds that are due over the next few years and exchanging them for new bonds that must be paid back in the more distant future. The Government Development Bank’s liquidity problem is particularly acute.
The latest meeting, which was streamed online to the public, was also meant to highlight the commonwealth’s efforts to be transparent with investors. In the past, Puerto Rico has been criticized for lack of disclosure.
Mr. García Padilla’s finance team and its many consultants, lobbyists and restructuring lawyers are walking a fine line as they try to restructure the island’s debt outside a bankruptcy filing.
On the one hand, they are trying to show Congress and the Obama administration that the island is in desperate need of bankruptcy authorization and other federal assistance, including increased Medicare financing. But the Puerto Rico government also faces a flood of potential lawsuits, and possibly scrutiny from securities regulators, if it is seen dealing unfairly with creditors.
As part of that effort to gain credibility, Ms. Acosta Febo said the governor would propose the creation of a financial control board to ensure that its broad plan to sort out the island’s finances is being followed.
The control board would be made up of members appointed by the governor and others selected independently, and could compel the government to follow its plan.
There have been calls in Congress to appoint a federal control board to oversee Puerto Rico. But unlike that idea, which would need congressional approval, the Puerto Rican governor’s proposal would be more homegrown.

A version of this article appears in print on July 14, 2015, on page B1 of the New York edition with the headline: Puerto Rico Faces Its Creditors in Early Debt Resolution Talks. [url=https://s100.copyright.com/AppDispatchServlet?contentID=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2015%2F07%2F14%2Fbusiness%2Fpuerto-rico-faces-its-creditors-in-early-debt-resolution-talks.html&publisherName=The+New+York+Times&publication=nytimes.com&token=&orderBeanReset=true&postType=&wordCount=1007&title=Puerto+Rico+Faces+Its+Creditors+in+Early+Debt+Resolution+Talks&publicationDate=July+13%2C+2015&author=By Michael Corkery]Order Reprints[/url]| Today's Paper|Subscribe

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Puerto Rico Faces Its Creditors in Early Debt Resolution Talks
By MICHAEL CORKERYJULY 13, 2015
Inside

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A for-sale sign hangs alongside a Puerto Rican flag on a balcony in Old San Juan. Credit Joe Raedle/Getty Images
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Continue reading the main story meeting on Monday between Puerto Rico and its creditors is any indication, restructuring the island’s $72 billion in debt could be a long process.
At that meeting, the commonwealth’s finance team said it had not yet determined how it would seek to revamp the island’s obligations.
The roughly 350 creditors, such as hedge funds and money managers, that had packed into a Park Avenue auditorium on Monday afternoon were told they would have to wait several more weeks until a working group made up of Puerto Rico political leaders came up with formal recommendations for ending the island’s fiscal crisis.
“I ask for your patience while we develop a credible plan that meets all of our stakeholders’ objectives,” Melba Acosta Febo, the president of the Government Development Bank for Puerto Rico, told the creditors gathered at Citigroup’s executive headquarters.
The meeting, which lasted more than an hour, was the first time that creditors heard directly from Puerto Rico officials since Gov. Alejandro García Padilla declared two weeks ago that the island’s debt was not payable.
Photo



Rosa Arias, listening last month as Gov. Alejandro García Padilla told Puerto Ricans that the island’s $72 billion in debt was unpayable and that they would need to sacrifice to restore financial health. Credit Joe Raedle/Getty Images
The government spent most of its presentation on Monday reiterating the bleak condition of the island’s economy and calling for drastic measures like cutting sick leave for local workers and lowering the minimum wage to jump-start hiring. It has more municipal bond debt per capita than any American state.
Anne O. Krueger, a former chief economist for the World Bank and co-author of a report on Puerto Rico’s troubles, told investors that the United States territory was caught in an unusual bind. It is not a struggling sovereign nation that can tap the International Monetary Fund, nor is it a state with voting members of Congress. Yet, she concluded that its economy had great potential and was entirely “underutilized.”
But most of the questions from creditors like Deutsche Bank’s asset management unit and Brigade Capital Management focused on details of a possible debt restructuring. Investors asked, for example, whether the restructuring would extend to the general obligation bonds, which are supposed to carry a constitutional guarantee of repayment. Much of Puerto Rico’s debt is also widely held in mutual funds or other investment accounts by individual investors on the United States mainland.
Officials said they would look at each type of bond separately, but said the designated political leaders would first need to come up with a comprehensive plan that would address not only the debt, but also ways of cutting the deficit and stimulating the island’s economy.
Commonwealth officials aimed to strike a tone of cooperation with creditors by portraying the island’s fiscal woes as a common problem that all parties needed to work together to solve.
“It is our hope that you will engage with us in an open and transparent process,” said Jim Millstein, founder of Millstein & Company, who is advising Puerto Rico.
But the meeting was a reminder of the risks of investing in government debt. Creditors are now at the mercy of commonwealth officials, who must come up with a plan that is not only fiscally practical, but politically acceptable.
Advertisement
Continue reading the main story
Advertisement
Continue reading the main story
Advertisement
Continue reading the main story
Privately, investors have expressed frustration that Mr. García Padilla’s finance team has not provided more details about a restructuring. Some have complained that Puerto Rico officials are painting an overly dark picture to drum up support in Congress for some form of federal assistance. Specifically, Puerto Rico is lobbying aggressively for a bill that would allow its public enterprises access to federal bankruptcy courts, which they do not have under the island’s status as a United States territory.
Puerto Rico officials have said that the island’s residents have shouldered most of the burden through tax increases and pension cuts, and now it is time for creditors to make concessions to cut the debt burden. Mr. García Padilla has said publicly that the government may seek to postpone debt payments for a number of years and that all forms of the island debt could be restructured.
Citigroup, which hosted Monday’s meeting, has been hired as the lead broker-dealer for what the Puerto Rico government called “liability management transactions.” And while its government kept quiet about its restructuring strategy, there had been recent signals about how the process might unfold.
Last week, the Government Development Bank announced in a regulatory filing that it may seek the purchase of billions of dollars of its outstanding debt at a discount. The regulatory filing provided few details, but people briefed on the matter said the repurchase proposal could involve the development bank buying its bonds that are due over the next few years and exchanging them for new bonds that must be paid back in the more distant future. The Government Development Bank’s liquidity problem is particularly acute.
The latest meeting, which was streamed online to the public, was also meant to highlight the commonwealth’s efforts to be transparent with investors. In the past, Puerto Rico has been criticized for lack of disclosure.
Mr. García Padilla’s finance team and its many consultants, lobbyists and restructuring lawyers are walking a fine line as they try to restructure the island’s debt outside a bankruptcy filing.
On the one hand, they are trying to show Congress and the Obama administration that the island is in desperate need of bankruptcy authorization and other federal assistance, including increased Medicare financing. But the Puerto Rico government also faces a flood of potential lawsuits, and possibly scrutiny from securities regulators, if it is seen dealing unfairly with creditors.
As part of that effort to gain credibility, Ms. Acosta Febo said the governor would propose the creation of a financial control board to ensure that its broad plan to sort out the island’s finances is being followed.
The control board would be made up of members appointed by the governor and others selected independently, and could compel the government to follow its plan.
There have been calls in Congress to appoint a federal control board to oversee Puerto Rico. But unlike that idea, which would need congressional approval, the Puerto Rican governor’s proposal would be more homegrown.

A version of this article appears in print on July 14, 2015, on page B1 of the New York edition with the headline: Puerto Rico Faces Its Creditors in Early Debt Resolution Talks. [url=https://s100.copyright.com/AppDispatchServlet?contentID=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2015%2F07%2F14%2Fbusiness%2Fpuerto-rico-faces-its-creditors-in-early-debt-resolution-talks.html&publisherName=The+New+York+Times&publication=nytimes.com&token=&orderBeanReset=true&postType=&wordCount=1007&title=Puerto+Rico+Faces+Its+Creditors+in+Early+Debt+Resolution+Talks&publicationDate=July+13%2C+2015&author=By Michael Corkery]Order Reprints[/url]| Today's Paper|Subscribe

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MessageSujet: Re: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Mar 21 Juil 2015 - 8:40

Jowèl,
Nou pa di bagay yo senp.
Nou okouran detay yo.
Pòto Riko pat dwe lan sitiyasyon saa, kòm teritwa meriken.
Dèt yo an depase obligasyon Nouyòk pèkapita e yo pa gen reprezantasyon
Lan kongrè ak sena. Yo paka pran finansman IMF oubyen Bank Mondyal.
Yo pa gen stati yon peyi. Sèl avantaj yo genyen se al tabli lan vil meriken.
Spanish Harlem oubyen Florid.
Kijan yo pral peye 70 milya? Kijan yo fè dwe tout lajan saa?
Menmsi yo bese salè minimum, sa pakab reyini tout kòb saa.
Mwen gen zanmi Ponce, se amwe yap rele.
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MessageSujet: Re: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Mar 21 Juil 2015 - 10:13

SASAYE ;
POTORIKEN pa lan SPANISH HARLEM anko.
LWAYE SPANISH HARLEM two CHE pou yo ,jounen Jodi an ;paske l JANTRIFYE selon EKSPRESYON.
Se menm bagay lan ki ap rive lan HARLEM AFRIKEN AMERIKEN an swa di an pasan;POTORIKEN ak AFRIKEN AMERIKEN oblije al geri BOSKO yo BROOKLYN ak BRONXou byen lan VIL tankou HARTFORD  lan CONNECTICUT.

Men yon lot eksplikasyon lan sa ki ap rive POTORIKO an.Gen anpil EKSPLIKASYON:

Economic exodus means two-thirds of Puerto Ricans may soon live in states

The Caribbean territory, whose residents are US citizens, is groaning under $73bn debt forcing it to ration water, close schools and watch its health system collapse



A pedestrian walks through a street in Old San Juan as Puerto Rico’s economy continues to go downhill. Photograph: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Alan Yuhas in New York

@alanyuhas

Thursday 2 July 2015 07.00 EDT  Last modified on Tuesday 7 July 2015 15.48 EDT

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Analysis Puerto Rico in crisis: weighed down by $73bn debt as unemployment hits 14%
Joblessness stands at 14%, schools are closing and physicians are leaving in droves, but on the mainland, there is little awareness of the island’s struggles

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Facing a crisis of monumental proportions at home, tens of thousands of people are fleeing a Caribbean island in search of a better life in the United States only to find hardship and struggle on American shores. Their stories sound like those of millions of migrants – poverty at home, where the economy lies in tatters – but they differ from millions of others: they’re already American.
Unable to pay its $73bn debt, Puerto Rico has begun closing schools and watching its healthcare system collapse and 45% of its people living in poverty. A historic drought has prompted water rationing for a utility service hampered by years of poor planning. Emigration to the mainland has accelerated in recent years, activists say, and data shows that from 2003 to 2013 there was a population swing of more than 1.5 million people.
“This new wave of immigration can be compared with the immigration in the 1930s and 40s,” said Edgardo González, coordinator of the Defenders of Puerto Rico, an activist group. The Great Depression and second world war spurred the so-called “Great Migration”, when tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans moved to New York every year for nearly two decades.
Now most Puerto Ricans are arriving in central Florida, González said, but many cannot find jobs or even housing. “Some might stay with family for a few weeks, but for those who don’t have family, people end up homeless because of the lack of services,” he said.
“People end up living in hotels, living in cars or on the street. Then you have people who are homeless with kids, who get in trouble with the law, and you have to get into it with childcare and welfare services.”
In particular, González said that professionals with higher degrees were leaving the island in search of work, draining Puerto Rico of the talent it needs to resuscitate its economy and healthcare sector.
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Puerto Rico is a territory of the United States and Puerto Ricans enjoy US citizenship.
In New York, fears of the wave of immigration have seeped into the city’s sizable Puerto Rican communities. On Wednesday the Bronx borough president, Rubén Díaz Jr, warned on NPR that the surge would sap the city’s services, especially in the cash-strapped parts of his borough.
The Bronx is poorest of New York’s five boroughs, with almost 30% of its population living below the poverty line. Almost 300,000 Puerto Ricans live in Bronx County, more than any other in the country, according to 2010 data; Brooklyn’s Kings County and Orange County, Florida, follow at second and third.
“Puerto Rico continues to have people leave to the tune of 100 individuals on a daily basis,” said Díaz, who is himself of Puerto Rican descent. “We’re losing a doctor a day that is leaving the island and coming over here.
“The local governments here in the United States, we have to then absorb the added cost to our localities in order to provide services.”
Díaz said that his own family was struggling to cope: an uncle unable to receive quality healthcare, cousins who can’t find work and aunts who “haven’t seen a raise in their salary in decades”.
“This is an extremely dire situation,” he said.
He urged action by the federal government, saying Congress should give Puerto Rico the power to declare bankruptcy and restructure its debt. As a US territory, the semi-autonomous island does not have the same authorities that allow others to file for Chapter 9 bankruptcy, as Detroit did to cope with its own disastrous finances.
“We’re not asking for a bailout, we’re not asking for the federal government to give Puerto Rico a dime,” he said.
The White House spokesman, Josh Earnest, this week said that the Obama administration is not considering any form of bailout for the island.

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People walk through a shopping area in Río Piedras where many businesses have closed in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Wednesday. Photograph: Ricardo Arduengo/AP
Today, 60% of Puerto Ricans live in the States and 40% on the island according to a 2014 Pew report, with most moving to Florida. Cuny professors Edwin Meléndez and Carlos Vargas-Ramos predict that by 2020, it’s likely that two-thirds of Puerto Ricans will reside in US states.
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Díaz also praised Puerto Rico’s governor, Alejandro García Padilla, for the “courageous” act of admitting this week that the island’s debts are “not payable” in their current form.

The island’s delegate in Congress, Pedro Pierluisi, has also called for lawmakers to address the island’s political status, and introduced a bill that would grant Puerto Rico the powers to declare public enterprises bankrupt.
Pierluisi himself cannot vote in the House of Representatives.
He has also called for statehood for the territory, writing in a letter to the New York Times: “No people have ever prospered while being treated unequally, and it is not reasonable to expect Puerto Rico to be the exception to that rule.”
But the problem is probably more intractable than simply bestowing statehood or bankruptcy powers on the territory, said María Enchautegui, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute, a research thinktank.
Chapter 9 authorities “would be only for municipal debt, which is very small in the whole of Puerto Rico”, Enchautegui said. “So I don’t think that is going to solve a lot of the problem.”
Enchautegui suggested that Puerto Rico should restructure its varied debts not just to cut losses but to overhaul the government. “While we are looking at what agencies to eliminate or change, we could actually make a more efficient government,” she said. Restructuring public-private arrangements, as with electrical companies and utilities, could also bring in precious revenues, she added.
Such changes would not require Congress’s intervention, although Washington would have to get involved to bring Puerto Rico’s Medicaid and Medicare systems to the same level as the rest of the states.
Enchautegui also noted that Puerto Rico had succeeded in some ways, most notably with its accessible and good higher education. She said Puerto Rico should try to use its growing diaspora as a resource rather than lament it as a drain.
“The diaspora is now more than 5 million people, most who keep relations with Puerto Rico, have family there they go and visit,” she said. “Those could be human resources, capital and knowledge that can bring back investments, businesses, networks.
“They left the island, that’s the way they have dealt with the crisis, but they are very connected to it.”

  • This article was amended on 7 July 2015 to clarify that drought has prompted water rationing, not the debt crisis.



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MessageSujet: Re: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Mar 21 Juil 2015 - 20:12


Jowèl,
Mèsi daprèke w fè m wè bagay evolye lan Nouyòk. Monchè, mwen mansyonen Spanish Halèm paske mwen te konn frekante zòn saa anpil lan ane 70 yo.
Se là mwen te konn al jwe mizik ak mizisyen Potoriken,msan pale de medam yo. Mwen pase plizyè ane ap vwayaje la chaj fen d semen.
Wi bagay chanje apre tout tan saa.

Mwen senpatize anpil ak Borinqueños paske si Lagrès jwen ed ak sipò lanmen lòt peyi lan Inyon Ewopeyen, yo paka jwen finans,an lòt kote ke lan Washington.
Poukisa lòt eta tankou Florid, Nouyòk, Tekzas pa fe yon Bailout menjan Lalmay, Lafrans ak lòt yo fè pou Lagrès?
Mwen konnen repons lan deja.
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MessageSujet: Re: Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.   Mer 22 Juil 2015 - 7:06

Gen POTORIKEN lan SPANISH HARLEM toujou wi ,men se lan "PROJECT" yo ,ki jan nou rele sa "HLM" ?
Kote ou jwenn POTORIKEN toujou se lan WASHINGTON HEIGHTS ki vin KATYE DOMINIKEN yo.

Ou pa konn pou konbyen TAN anko ,paske LWAYE kontinye ap grenpe e BLAN yo ap tounen ,y ap "JANTRIFYE"

Kounye an POTORIKEN tankou m te di l se BRONX yo lage KO yo E menm HARTFORD lan CNNECTCUT,Yo estime ke 40% POPILASYON HARTFORD lan se PORORIKEN ;menm MAJISTRA VIL sa a ,se OTORIKEN!
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Pòto Riko lan menm sitiyasyon ak Lagrès.
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