Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

FOROM AYITI : Tèt Ansanm Pou'n Chanje Ayiti.
 
AccueilAccueil  GalerieGalerie  PortailPortail  CalendrierCalendrier  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Sasaye
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 7603
Localisation : Canada
Opinion politique : Indépendance totale
Loisirs : Arts et Musique, literature kréyòl
Date d'inscription : 02/03/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Maestro

MessageSujet: Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?   Lun 5 Déc 2016 - 15:50

Haiti’s Fraudulent Presidential Frontrunner Seizes Land for His Own Banana Republic

Two years ago, Haiti's presidential frontrunner Jovenel Moïse displaced hundreds of farmers to build an exporting banana plantation. It's an omen of things to come.

Joshua Steckley and Beverly Bell
01/22/2016
Banana plantation in Haiti on land seized by Agritrans (Photo by Joshua Steckley)

A version of this piece originally appeared in Upside Down World.

Two years ago, Jovenel Moïse, the only man running in Haiti’s fraudulent presidential election run-offs this Sunday, dispossessed as many as 800 peasants and destroyed houses and crops, according to farmers’ associations leaders in the Trou-du-Nord zone. Those affected farmers, who had been farming the land legally, remain homeless and out of work. In its place is a private banana plantation owned by Moïse’s company, Agritrans.

Agritrans received at least $6 million in state loans, and possibly much more, to grow bananas for export in the hungry nation. Agritrans seized a 1,000-hectare (2,371-acre) tract from farmers, bulldozed their houses and fields, used bribes to buy local support, distorted claims of its benefit to local residents, and created a phantom organization to legitimate itself.

In order to run, Moïse stepped down as the head of Agritrans last year, though he is still campaigning under the moniker Nèg Bannann, or “The Banana Man.” He portrays himself as an entrepreneur determined to transform Haiti’s agricultural sector into private enterprise. If he becomes president, the company Moïse created would likely foster further loss of domestic food production and family livelihoods.

Moïse hails from the political party of the current president Michel Martelly, whose principal platform has been “Haiti: Open for Business.” Martelly himself came into office in 2011 through an election mired in chaos, backed – like the current one – by the US. Secretary of State and the OAS. In 2011, Hillary Clinton played a pivotal role in imposing Martelly.

Moïse will be the only candidate to appear on the run-off election’s presidential ballot. The only other candidate posed to run, Jude Celestin, refused to participate, calling the process “a farce… [of] selections.”

A Moïse presidency would ensure that political decisions prioritize free trade and private enterprise over support for the destitute majority. This, in turn, would likely give a green light to massive land grabs that are planned or in process, leading to further dispossession of peasants working the land.

The August 2013 expulsion of hundreds of farmers forced out hundreds of farmers who were legally using the land. Local leader Milosten Castin, coordinator of the organization Action to Reforest and Defend the Environment, said that, with no warning, several bulldozers invaded the land, plowing under crops and forage used for grazing. The machines later destroyed the homes of at least 17 families, many of whom remain homeless today.

After protests organized by the Peasant Movement for the Development of Deveren (MPDD), Agritrans gave the owners of the destroyed homes between $40 and $700 each in compensation. Gilles St. Pierre, a member of MPDD who lost his concrete block house, said the compensation was inadequate. “What am I supposed to do with 700 dollars?” he asked in a phone interview last week. “I had a house and land… and now I work as a taxi driver.”


The Agritrans plantation is the first agricultural free trade zone in the country, established by the Ministry of Commerce and Industry. This allows the company to take advantage of perks of reduced tax and tariff payments, along with special customs treatment. By Haitian law, free trade zones must export at least 70% of their products. Currently, Agritrans’ production - an estimated 40 containers of bananas weekly – is shipped to Germany. At the same time, Haiti does not produce enough food to feed itself. Destitute Haitians must rely on imported staples, whose costs are expected to rise this year.

“They’re sending bananas overseas, and now we have to go to the border to buy Dominican bananas and plantains… It doesn’t make sense.”The irony of shipping food to Europe was not lost on one woman whose land was seized. Asking to remain anonymous for fear of retribution, she said, “They’re sending bananas overseas, and now we have to go to the border to buy Dominican bananas and plantains… It doesn’t make sense.”

Another land grab may be imminent. In order to comply with the contract with its German clients, Agritrans must ramp up production within the next three years in order to ship 150 containers, equaling 160,000 tons, to Germany each week. According the current CEO of Agritrans, Pierre-Richard Joseph, this increase will require 3,000 more hectares of land.

One of the main demands of peasant groups in the region, like their counterparts around Haiti, is food sovereignty, which would allow the people to democratically control the production of food to meet the needs of their country through local, ecological, and small-scale agriculture. Another demand is government support for family farming, including access to land, water, and markets.

“Haitian agriculture is based on peasant farms,” said Castin. The World Bank estimates that 80% of Haiti’s rural population is engaged in small-scale agriculture. “Any plan must support their mode of [growing],” he said. “That’s what will change this country.”






Moïse described the land in question as “abandoned,” and also stated that Haiti has over one million hectares of land “that is being used for nothing.” Local peasant groups disagree. They argue that prior to Agritrans’ takeover of the 1,000 hectares, the semi-arid land was actively used by peasants, despite the limited resources available to them. Peasant organizations and individual farmers were grazing cattle on it, and selling the milk to NGOs and small-scale milk and yogurt processors. Other farmers grew crops like millet, cassava, corn, beans, and sweet potatoes, both to feed their families and sell on the local market.

Now that the land is held by Agritrans with millions of dollars in state loans invested in it, row upon row of lush banana trees grow, irrigated by pumping groundwater. The transformation reveals a fundamentally political question: If the land had the capacity to become so productive, why didn’t the government support peasant farmers to make it so, instead of providing massive support to private interests?

A woman living near the banana plantation stated, requesting anonymity, “The government builds roads,” so “they could easily build water reservoirs and irrigation canals. But they don’t.”






In his campaign, Moïse has cited the banana plantation in his campaign as evidence of his ability to create much-needed jobs in a country where only 13% of its people are formally employed. Agritrans says it will create 3,000 desperately needed jobs once the plantation reaches it full capacity, in turn propelling the local economy.

As of March 2015, only 600 jobs had been created, including for agronomists, engineers, agricultural technicians, and farm laborers. However, according to interviews with some of those laborers, “jobs” on the seized land are only offered in 15-day shifts. This creates both precarious, short-term jobs for families and misleading employment figures.

Workers are paid the minimum wage of 200 gourdes (US$3.53) per day, plus a plate of food — an amount which Haitian workers and other organizations, as well as some prominent factory owners, say cannot support a household. The minimum wage covers just 19-37% of the cost of living in Haiti.

Moïse has claimed that smallholding farmers are included in the banana business, as they provide labor as well as hold a 20% minority share in the business. He cited the so-called Peasant Federation of Pizans (FEPAP) to back this claim. Although Moïse said that FEPAP was made up of a consortium of eight local peasant farmer associations, according to leaders active around the plantation area, this claim is false. In an interview, Josaphat Antoneus, coordinator of a peasant coalition, agreed. “FEPAP is a phantom organization,” he said. “Peasant inclusion in the business is a facade [Agritrans] wants to give at the global level.”

Castin claims that the so-called peasant groups that make up FEPAP “were active back in 1980s. Maybe they still have a president, or a secretary, but they have no members today.” Even so, the organizations that allegedly comprise the confederation of FEPAP had legal access to only approximately 100 hectares prior to Agritrans’ take-over. When asked about FEPAP’s 20% shareholder status, Castin laughed. “Twenty percent of what? No one in FEPAP is in Agritrans’ administration; they don’t know what the profits are.”

Ben St. Jacques, an activist with a community organization in the area, claimed that Agritrans bribed peasants to support the project, offering motorcycles and televisions to FEPAP members.

According to residents, most of those who found employment with Agritrans had never before had access to the land. Conversely, most of those who had worked the land before being kicked off, and who had protested their eviction, never found wage-work on the plantation.

For Gilles St. Pierre, who lost his home to the plantation, while the January 24 single-candidate presidential run-off itself is a farce, its outcome is deadly serious. “If Jovenel [Moïse] is elected, he’ll have the same people around him, and he’ll do the same thing again. It will be a disaster for small farmers, even those with legal rights to the land.”

“If Jovenel becomes president,” he said, “this country is finished.”

Joshua Steckley is a research and freelance videographer who has spent over five years living in Haiti. Beverly Bell, coordinator of Other Worlds, is an organizer and writer who has worked with social movements in Haiti for 35 years. Natalie Miller, Other Worlds’ Media and Education Coordinator, also helped with this article.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Joel
Membre-fondateur
Membre-fondateur


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 14891
Localisation : USA
Loisirs : Histoire
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le patriote

MessageSujet: Re: Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?   Mer 7 Déc 2016 - 5:46

“If Jovenel becomes president,” he said, “this country is finished.”

Mwen li plizye DOSYE sou JOVNEL ki rive a menm KONKLIZYON an.
Misye se yon POPE TWEL ki san BOURAJ anndan l.

Si PEP lan ta kite MAFYA sa a ,pran POUVWA a anko,pa gen okenn ESPWA pou PEYI sa a!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Alves
Super Senior


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 100
Localisation : Port-au-Prince
Opinion politique : Neutre
Loisirs : football
Date d'inscription : 04/01/2014

MessageSujet: Re: Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?   Mer 7 Déc 2016 - 9:04

Biographie de Jovenel Moïse





Jovenel Moïse est né au Trou du Nord (département du Nord-Est) le 26 juin 1968 d’une famille modeste. C’est de son père, Etienne Moïse, mécanicien et agriculteur, qu’il a hérité de son amour de la terre. Sa mère, Lucia Bruno, de regrettée mémoire, couturière, commerçante, lui a appris, en plus des valeurs civiques et morales, le sens de la responsabilité dès l’enfance. Ses parents, en dépit de leur éducation limitée, ont su lui transmettre des principes stricts et une discipline rigoureuse. Ces fortes valeurs alliées à ses capacités innées ont permis à Jovenel Moïse, le « natif-natal », de toujours se distinguer et ont fait de lui aujourd’hui un agro-entrepreneur à succès et un modèle indéniable pour notre société.

Émigré avec sa famille à Port-au-Prince en juillet 1974, il a continué ses études primaires à l’Ecole Nationale Don Durélin, et poursuivit ses études secondaires au Lycée Toussaint Louverture d’abord; ensuite, au Centre Culturel du Collège Canado Haïtien.

Plus tard il fréquente la Faculté des Sciences de l’Education de l’Université Quisqueya. Malgré son avenir d’éducateur déjà tracé, il change de direction pour se lancer dans l’entreprenariat. En 1996, il épouse sa camarade de classe Martine Marie Etienne Joseph. La même année, ce jeune homme entreprenant, mature et plein d’enthousiasme, quitte la capitale et s’installe à Port-de-Paix avec le rêve ardent de développer l’arrière pays, rêve qui ne le quittera jamais.

Avec très peu de capital d’investissement, il crée sa première entreprise à Port-de-Paix, JOMAR Auto Parts, encore opérationnelle à nos jours. C’est à partir de cette petite entreprise, créée avec son épouse, que tous les projets du couple Moïse commencent à prendre corps. La même année, son amour de la terre oriente ses efforts vers la mise en place d’un projet agricole. Cette fois-ci Jovenel met sur pied une plantation de bananes s’étendant sur 10 hectares dans le Département du Nord-Ouest.

Peu de temps après, sa femme attend une fille, et le futur père de famille, prend conscience que l’accès à l’eau potable représente un enjeu majeur dans l’arrière pays, et se lance encore dans un projet innovateur. Fort de ses expériences et décidé d’apporter une solution, il se met en partenariat avec la compagnie Culligan de Port-au-Prince. En 2001, Jovenel combine des prêts d’institutions financières et de particuliers, non sans difficulté, et débute une usine d’eau qui distribuera de l’eau potable dans les régions du Nord-Ouest et du Nord-Est.

A partir de ses succès dans le monde des affaires et son désir d’appuyer le développement communautaire, Jovenel devient membre de la Chambre de Commerce et de l’Industrie du Nord-Ouest (CCINO) en 2004. Encore il se distingue par son leadership naturel et en très peu de temps, il est élu président de la CCINO. En effet, sa capacité à bâtir une synergie de groupe vers la réalisation d’un objectif commun, lui gagne de devenir secrétaire général de la Chambre de Commerce et de l’Industrie d’Haïti (CCIH). En leader dynamique, il joue un rôle prépondérant dans l’intégration des chambres de commerce régionales afin d’assurer leur pleine et juste représentation au sein de la Chambre de Commerce Nationale.

Entrepreneur perspicace, Moïse sait identifier les problèmes et les transformer en opportunités au bénéfice de tous. Intéressé par l’électrification régionale, il forme en 2008 une autre compagnie, la Compagnie Haïtienne d’Energie S.A. (COMPHENER S.A.) cette fois ci avec des associés. Ils désirent, à travers ce projet, apporter l’énergie solaire et éolienne aux 10 communes du département du Nord-Ouest.

Il fonde AGRITRANS S.A. en 2012, portant le projet agricole NOURRIBIO, au Trou du Nord, à devenir la toute première Zone Franche Agricole haïtienne. Avec ce projet, Jovenel Moïse a pu « transformer un site voué à l’abandon en un projet de développement durable intégré et qui servira de modèle pour le développement du secteur agricole en Haïti ». Ce n’est qu’un début vers la réalisation du rêve de Jovenel, proclamé « nèg banann nan » (l’homme de la banane) qui est de refaire d’Haïti un pays « essentiellement agricole ».

Le projet NOURRIBIO a déjà permis l’émergence de plus d’une dizaine de projets agricoles qui ont créé près de 3,000 emplois directs et 10,000 emplois indirects. Ce projet est le plus innovant en Haïti et le plus grand que la Caraïbe ait connu jusqu’à date. Pour Moïse, il est important qu’Haïti retrouve sa place sur la carte mondiale des pays exportateurs.

Ce leader a l’art de donner du sens et de mobiliser les foules. Persévérant et débrouillard, Jovenel est un exemple non seulement dans ses paroles, mais surtout dans ses actions qui produisent un effet beaucoup plus fort que ce qu’il dit. Jovenel Moïse est porteur d’une expérience éprouvée par le façonnement de consensus et de collaboration entre des groupes de personnes ayant des intérêts différents. Grâce à son charisme, il a l’art de communiquer une vision inspirante pour tous et pour chacun. Son sens de responsabilité demeure la pierre angulaire de sa réussite, dans ses entreprises, dans sa famille et dans son pays. C’est un promoteur, réceptif et attentif, qui croit en l’harmonie, et cherche la cohésion. Il favorise les interactions et comprend les besoins de l’équipe, qu’il cherche à satisfaire.

En 2015, le Président de la République d’Haïti, Michel Joseph Martelly, désigne Jovenel Moïse comme candidat à la présidence du parti politique qu’il a fondé, le Parti Haïtien Tèt Kale (PHTK). Le Président Martelly voit en Jovenel un « agent de production nationale » ayant toutes les capacités de pérenniser sa vision d’une « Haïti transformée ». Pour Jovenel Moïse, ce sont les objectifs socio-économiques nationaux qui priment. « Mon leadership, axé sur les résultats, guidera mon gouvernement tout en m’efforçant de rendre mon pays encore plus fort et meilleur pour l’ensemble des familles haïtiennes.»

Jovenel Moïse marchande, partout ou il passe, sa vision d’agriculture bioécologique comme moteur de l’économie haïtienne, créatrice d’emplois et génératrice de richesses pour une population dont plus de 50% est rurale. Il propose l’agriculture comme point de départ pour la relance économique. Sa politique englobe aussi les éléments qui ont été le cheval de bataille de Martelly: l’éducation pour tous, l’accès à la santé, la réforme de l’énergie, l’état de droit, la création d’emplois durables, la protection de l’environnement, et le développement d’Haïti come une destination touristique en y ajoutant l’éco-tourisme et l’agro-tourisme. La passion pour le développement du pays, les capacités innovantes, le leadership naturel et la vision progressiste pour Haïti, dont fait montre Jovenel Moïse, sont des atouts majeurs pour faire face au défi de la relance économique et structurelle d’une nouvelle Haïti.

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Sasaye
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 7603
Localisation : Canada
Opinion politique : Indépendance totale
Loisirs : Arts et Musique, literature kréyòl
Date d'inscription : 02/03/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Maestro

MessageSujet: Re: Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?   Mer 7 Déc 2016 - 14:32


San animozite pèsonèl kont Jovnèl. Li merite kredi pou aktivite kòm entreprenè.
Mwen ta vle kwè ke biografi saa kòrèk.
E si se vre, konpliman.

Misye te dwe kontinye aktivite sayo ki pi bon pou devlopman agritilki peyi an, si premye atik la lan erè.

Sepandan, misye pa t dwe ap swiv Mateli kòm pwoksi pou reprezante enterè etranje. Paske vizyon ou bay sou Mateli an pa kòrèk. Ni lan edikasyon pou tout moun, ni lan Ayiti open for business.

Misye rantre lan magouy politik avèk Antonio Sola ki mete menm estrateji ki te itilize lan dènye eleksyon Meksiko. Menm estrateji Mateli ak Lamòt. Menm estrateji ki retire Lamòt mete Evans Paul.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» Eske nèg Ki ap mande pou aksepte rezilta eleksyon yo okouran?
» Men Rezilta eleksyon pou prezidan Myrlande antèt.
» Ambasad USA pa dako avèk rezilta eleksyon yo.
» Asepte Rezilta Eleksyon
» ESKE KEP PRAL BAY REZILTA POUSANTAJ AK VOT PREMYE TOU AVAN DEZYÈM TOU ELEKSYON

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti :: Haiti :: Espace Haïti-
Sauter vers: