Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

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 The Haitians of Cayman

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Nombre de messages : 7722
Localisation : Canada
Opinion politique : Indépendance totale
Loisirs : Arts et Musique, literature kréyòl
Date d'inscription : 02/03/2007

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MessageSujet: The Haitians of Cayman   Mar 6 Jan 2009 - 12:09

size=12]Reprinted from Cayman Net News[/size]
caymannetnews.com

The Haitians of Cayman
Published on Sunday, January 4, 2009


Mrs Maris Sariego: “Once you try Haitian food, you will not stop eating it.”
In part 21 of a series on the many nationalities that have made the Cayman Islands a true international melting pot, Senior Writer Steven Knipp takes a look at the Haitian community in Cayman.
The star-crossed 10,700 square-mile nation of Haiti is unique in the Caribbean on several counts. It was the first independent nation in the entire region, and the only country in the Caribbean to gain its freedom after a successful slave rebellion. It is also the only primarily Francophone nation in the Caribbean.
The leader of this historic slave revolt, Toussaint Louverture, soon established a professional army and drove the invading Spanish out of this former French colony. But he was later assassinated; and since then Haiti has been plagued by a series of largely corrupt leaders and this trend has made life very difficult for most of today’s 8.7 million Haitians.
Though the country is extremely poor economically, the Haitians themselves are a proud people, with a tradition in art and music that is virtually unrivalled in the Caribbean.
According to the Cayman government statistics office, there are some 14 Haitian permit holders living here.
Haitian Yves Fontaine, who is an Auxiliary Constable with Royal Cayman Islands Police Service, is from Les Cayes, Haiti’s third largest city. He first arrived here in October 2004.
He came to Cayman, he says, “with the help of James Denny Jackson, who is the senior pastor of Faith Christian Church in Grand Cayman. He often visited the Church Of Christ, my church in Les Cayes, Haiti. And after Ivan he had applied for a work permit for some friends and me.
“The best thing about living in Cayman, Constable Fontaine says, “is the peace, and security, and the friendly people. In his free time, he likes “going to church, spending time with my family, my job and dancing salsa and bachata.”
What he misses most about Haiti, are “my two kids – Yvans, age seven, and Yves-Marlie, age six; and my father and sisters. I also miss my Haitian food, my rivers, and my music.”
Haitian Maris Sariego says, “I first came to Cayman when I was 15 years on a cruise ship with my parents, sisters and brothers. All I remember were the Turtle Farm and the deep blue sea.
“I came back to Cayman when my husband Chris, who is from Chile, was offered the position of managing director at the Marriott Grand Cayman after Ivan. For almost four years now he has been Manager of the Ritz.
“I was born in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, but grew up in Petionville, 20 minutes from the capital, up in the mountains.
“After my studies at Florida International University, where I got my bachelors degree in hospitality management, my husband and I lived in Texas for two years, and then moved back to Miami for another two years before returning to Cayman.
“I worked in the hotel industry for over 10 years, but since in Cayman, I have been staying home and taking care of my children.
“My daughter Anais is eight, my son Tristan six. They are very fortunate to be able to speak three languages – French, Spanish and English. They also enjoy playing tennis, watching TV and spending time with their dog, Brownie; their hamster, Snowflake; and their fish, Color, Rainbow and Rosette.
“I love my garden and can spend my days outside taking care of my plants. I enjoy spending time with my children and husband – biking, going to the beach, watching TV, going to the movies, traveling, and taking my dog for a run every day.
“I do a lot of volunteer work. My last task was to collect food, clothes and money, to send to Haiti after Gustav. Haiti is always the country that receives the most damage after such storms.
“What I like most about Cayman is meeting so many people from different places.
Since we are all from everywhere, we all have become each other’s family. I enjoy learning about other people’s culture, and food.
“I love going to the beach or driving the kids to school in over five minutes. I love Cayman being a safer place than the other countries in the Caribbean.”
Asked what she misses most about her homeland, Maris says, “I miss my relatives, my parents, my food, my lifestyle, my music, my mountains. I also miss speaking French and Creole.
“Haiti is a beautiful country. Yes, it is very poor, but we are also rich in culture, music, and especially in art. Haitian people are very friendly; we open our hearts to others. We love to dance. Family is very important to us. Our roots are from both France and Africa.
And once you try Haitian food you will not be able to stop eating it!”
Another notable Haitian living in Grand Cayman is Rev. Louis Sully who is Minister for the East End and Gun Bay United Church and is married to a Caymanian.

Copyright© 2007 Cayman Net News at www.caymannetnews.com All Rights Reserved
Licence is granted for free print and distribution.
]
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MessageSujet: Re: The Haitians of Cayman   Mar 6 Jan 2009 - 17:19

Sasaye a écrit:
size=12]Reprinted from Cayman Net News[/size]
caymannetnews.com


The Haitians of Cayman
Published on Sunday, January 4, 2009


Mrs Maris Sariego: “Once you try Haitian food, you will not stop eating it.”
In part 21 of a series on the many nationalities that have made the Cayman Islands a true international melting pot, Senior Writer Steven Knipp takes a look at the Haitian community in Cayman.
The star-crossed 10,700 square-mile nation of Haiti is unique in the Caribbean on several counts. It was the first independent nation in the entire region, and the only country in the Caribbean to gain its freedom after a successful slave rebellion. It is also the only primarily Francophone nation in the Caribbean.
The leader of this historic slave revolt, Toussaint Louverture, soon established a professional army and drove the invading Spanish out of this former French colony. But he was later assassinated; and since then Haiti has been plagued by a series of largely corrupt leaders and this trend has made life very difficult for most of today’s 8.7 million Haitians.
Though the country is extremely poor economically, the Haitians themselves are a proud people, with a tradition in art and music that is virtually unrivalled in the Caribbean.
According to the Cayman government statistics office, there are some 14 Haitian permit holders living here.
Haitian Yves Fontaine, who is an Auxiliary Constable with Royal Cayman Islands Police Service, is from Les Cayes, Haiti’s third largest city. He first arrived here in October 2004.
He came to Cayman, he says, “with the help of James Denny Jackson, who is the senior pastor of Faith Christian Church in Grand Cayman. He often visited the Church Of Christ, my church in Les Cayes, Haiti. And after Ivan he had applied for a work permit for some friends and me.
“The best thing about living in Cayman, Constable Fontaine says, “is the peace, and security, and the friendly people. In his free time, he likes “going to church, spending time with my family, my job and dancing salsa and bachata.”
What he misses most about Haiti, are “my two kids – Yvans, age seven, and Yves-Marlie, age six; and my father and sisters. I also miss my Haitian food, my rivers, and my music.”
Haitian Maris Sariego says, “I first came to Cayman when I was 15 years on a cruise ship with my parents, sisters and brothers. All I remember were the Turtle Farm and the deep blue sea.
“I came back to Cayman when my husband Chris, who is from Chile, was offered the position of managing director at the Marriott Grand Cayman after Ivan. For almost four years now he has been Manager of the Ritz.
“I was born in Port-au-Prince, the capital of Haiti, but grew up in Petionville, 20 minutes from the capital, up in the mountains.
“After my studies at Florida International University, where I got my bachelors degree in hospitality management, my husband and I lived in Texas for two years, and then moved back to Miami for another two years before returning to Cayman.
“I worked in the hotel industry for over 10 years, but since in Cayman, I have been staying home and taking care of my children.
“My daughter Anais is eight, my son Tristan six. They are very fortunate to be able to speak three languages – French, Spanish and English. They also enjoy playing tennis, watching TV and spending time with their dog, Brownie; their hamster, Snowflake; and their fish, Color, Rainbow and Rosette.
“I love my garden and can spend my days outside taking care of my plants. I enjoy spending time with my children and husband – biking, going to the beach, watching TV, going to the movies, traveling, and taking my dog for a run every day.
“I do a lot of volunteer work. My last task was to collect food, clothes and money, to send to Haiti after Gustav. Haiti is always the country that receives the most damage after such storms.
“What I like most about Cayman is meeting so many people from different places.
Since we are all from everywhere, we all have become each other’s family. I enjoy learning about other people’s culture, and food.
“I love going to the beach or driving the kids to school in over five minutes. I love Cayman being a safer place than the other countries in the Caribbean.”
Asked what she misses most about her homeland, Maris says, “I miss my relatives, my parents, my food, my lifestyle, my music, my mountains. I also miss speaking French and Creole.
“Haiti is a beautiful country. Yes, it is very poor, but we are also rich in culture, music, and especially in art. Haitian people are very friendly; we open our hearts to others. We love to dance. Family is very important to us. Our roots are from both France and Africa.
And once you try Haitian food you will not be able to stop eating it!”
Another notable Haitian living in Grand Cayman is Rev. Louis Sully who is Minister for the East End and Gun Bay United Church and is married to a Caymanian.

Copyright© 2007 Cayman Net News at www.caymannetnews.com All Rights Reserved
Licence is granted for free print and distribution.

]


Pou yon fwa gin yon bel atik sou pep nou an, pep ayisien an. Min Bagay ke mwen régrété, sé ke nou ayisien, pa jamn montré ti moun nou yo pâlé kreyol. Sé anba chal nou mem,jéness lan apran lang saa lè nap tandé paren nou yo ap palé. Madmoizelle lan di ke li "miss" palé kreyol ak fransé min li pa apren ti moun li yo palé kreyol tandis ke li apran yo palé panyol ak fransé... Mwen mem sak fet mwen ka debrouyé'm en kreyol, tankou anpil moun ki fet nan diaspora, m'té gin yon zanmi ki té fek soti ayiti... Sé avel mwen té konn le pli souvan palé kreyol. Sé yon bagay ki domaj paské panyol yo c panyol yo montré ti moun yo palé ... En touka, yon bel atik é sé yon péyi ke mwen ta rinmin dekouvri.
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