Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

FOROM AYITI : Tèt Ansanm Pou'n Chanje Ayiti.
 
AccueilAccueil  GalerieGalerie  PortailPortail  CalendrierCalendrier  PublicationsPublications  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Election au Honduras

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Election au Honduras   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 7:00

Election au Honduras



Source: CCTV.com | 11-29-2009 14:32

Taille du texte: T+ | T-

C'est ce dimanche que se déroule la présidentielle tant attendue au Honduras. Elle pourrait permettre de trouver une solution à six mois de crise politique. Les deux principaux candidats souhaitent que le résultat soit reconnu sur la scène internationale.
Porfirio Lobo, qui avait perdu la présidentielle il y a quatre ans au profit du président déchu Manuel Zelaya, possède une avance à deux chiffres dans les derniers sondages. A 61 ans, le candidat conservateur a déclaré samedi qu'il avait reçu l'assurance d'un certain nombre de pays que le résultat de l'élection serait reconnu.
Porfirio Lobo
Candidat du parti national
"Je leur ai parlé personnellement et ils m'ont dit "Ne t'en fais pas, nous les reconnaîtrons, donne-nous seulement un peu de temps."
Porfirio Lobo a par ailleurs souligné que l'élection était légitime même si elle se déroule après un coup d'Etat.
Porfirio Lobo
Candidat du parti national
“L'élection de dimanche est constitutionnelle, elle est légitime et entre dans la Constitution. ”
Son rival Elvin Santos a été vice-président sous la présidence de Zelaya et a démissionné pour se présenter. Il estime que le sort de Zelaya sera décidé par la Loi après l'élection.
Elvin Santos
Candidat du parti libéral
"La justice et ce qui s'est passé le 28 juin vont dépendre des institutions et de la Loi. "
La question est de savoir s'il faut soutenir le scrutin et permettre au Honduras de réintégrer la communauté internationale. Elle divise le pays.
A l'ambassade du Brésil, le président déchu Manuel Zelaya continue à appeler au boycott de l'élection et demande à la communauté internationale de s'abstenir à toute reconnaissance du résultat.
Fu Yake, CCTV.
var para_count=1



Rédacteur: Tao Ruogu
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 7:15

Tegucigalpa, Honduras (CNN) -- Conservative candidate Porfirio Lobo gave a jubilant speech of appreciation to supporters early Monday, as preliminary results showed him leading in the Honduran presidential election.
Hopes worldwide were pinned on the election ending a political stalemate sparked by a coup in June.
The National Party of Honduras candidate had 56 percent of the vote in the Sunday ballot, election officials said.
Political crisis has gripped Honduras since the military forced President Jose Manuel Zelaya from office on June 28.
Zelaya's supporters called for a boycott on grounds that participating in the vote would legitimize the de facto government of Roberto Micheletti, who replaced Zelaya.
Despite fears of unrest, election day was calm and without major incident. About 35,000 police and soldiers were deployed across the country.
The de facto government is hoping the international community will recognize the winner.
The coup, condemned worldwide, led to the cutting of foreign aid to Honduras and dealt a painful blow to its economy.
Costa Rican President Oscar Arias has said his government will recognize the election results. So has the United States, which said the clock will be reset after the elections.
In the aftermath of Zelaya's ouster, the United Nations, the Organization of American States, the European Union and most nations -- including the United States -- condemned the coup and demanded that he be reinstated immediately.
Five months later, the ousted president is holed up in the Brazilian embassy in the Honduran capital, where he sought refuge after secretly returning to his country on September 21.
The supreme court has ruled that Zelaya cannot return to office without facing trial on charges that he acted unconstitutionally when he tried to hold a referendum that could have changed presidential term limits.
Micheletti stepped down temporarily to distance himself from Sunday's vote. He said he will resume office Wednesday.
Sunday's ballot will also decide 128 seats in the nation's unicameral Congress, as well as other local posts.

The new president is to be sworn in January 27.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Honduran People Massively Boycott Sham Elections;   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 14:04

Honduran People Massively Boycott
Sham Elections; National Resistance Front to Hold Victory March &
Rally Today (Nov. 30)


[Note: The following
article has been reprinted from Informations Ouvrières (Labor News),
the weekly newspaper of the French Independent Workers Party (POI).
The POI supports the campaigns of the International Liaison Committee
of Workers and Peoples (ILC).
]


By ANDREU CAMPS


"It is with great pleasure that
we announce to the Honduran people and to the international community
that the electoral farce organized by the Micheletti dictatorship was
defeated by the very low turnout at the polls, so much so that the
Supreme Electoral Tribunal was obliged to keep the polls open one more
hour to try to increase participation."



This is how the National Front of
Resistance Against the Coup in Honduras began its Communiqué No. 40,
which they issued the evening of November 29. The statement by the
National Front of Resistance continues:



"The voter monitoring conducted
by our organization at polling booths nationwide indicates a level of
abstention of at least 65% to 70% -- the highest rate of abstention in
our nation's history. This is how the Honduran people have punished
the candidates of the coup and the dictatorship -- all of whom are
going to have a very hard time trying to convince world public opinion
that a high percentage of the people turned out to vote, when no such
thing happened. ...



"Considering that this result
represents a great victory for the people of Honduras, the National
Resistance Front calls upon all the people to celebrate tomorrow this
defeat of the dictatorship. Everyone is asked to gather at this Great
Assembly as of 12 noon on Monday, November 30 at the STIBYS trade
union hall in Tegucigalpa, from which the Grand Victory March against
the electoral farce will take off at 3 p.m."



More Than 65% of the Voters
Abstained



Ever since June 28, when the high
command of the Honduran Army organized a coup to remove democratically
elected President Manuel Zelaya, more than five months of mobilization
and resistance against the coup ensued. These have been five months of
bitter struggle against repression and martial law that resulted in
the deaths of dozens of resistance fighters and the wholesale
violation of democratic rights.



And it was precisely with aim of
"institutionalizing" this military coup that the Micheletti
dictatorship organized these "elections."



De-Facto Support by the U.S.
Administration



Despite contradictory statements
made by top officials in relation to the June 28 coup, the U.S.
administration has, in fact, supported the coup government of
Micheletti up until the very last moment. It also approved the holding
of these elections. On November 5, Under Secretary of State Thomas
Shannon stated the United States would recognize the legitimacy of the
elections of November 29 even if President Zelaya were not restored to
office, thus torpedoing what had been expected in the agreement signed
on October 30.



This stance has provoked enormous
contradictions within the U.S. administration and even within the
Democratic Party. But more important, it generated sharp opposition
from the new president of the AFL-CIO, Richard Trumka, who not only
condemned the June 28 coup but issued a public and widely circulated
letter to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton denouncing the legitimacy
of the November 29 elections.



Following the lead of the U.S.
administration, the governments of Panama, Costa Rica, Colombia and
Peru supported the legitimacy of these sham elections. By contrast --
following the lead of the overwhelming majority of the trade unions
and workers' organizations across the continent -- the governments of
Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Bolivia, Ecuador, Cuba,
and Nicaragua stated that they would not recognize these
elections.



Abstention Despite Martial
Law



The coup government of Micheletti
did everything possible to force the Honduran people to participate in
the elections. According to TeleSUR, all government employees were
ordered to vote and to show the ink on their fingers upon returning to
their worksites. Employees who failed to produce such inkmarks could
be fired immediately. Numerous private companies also threatened the
workers with dismissal if they did not vote. Others still handed out
numbered ballots to their employees.



We must keep in mind that the
parties that participated in the election are the Liberal Party and
the National Party. These parties of the oligarchy supported the coup.
Despite this fact, 20 candidates out of the initial 62 candidates of
the Liberal Party heeded the call by Zelaya and stepped down from
running in the election, thereby joining the boycott
movement.



All the worker and popular
organizations that make up the National Resistance Front -- a front
that was constituted at the initiative of the three trade union
federations -- organized a boycott of the elections. Only one
sector of the Party of Democratic Unification decided to participate
in the electoral farce.



The Army and police were mobilized
and occupied the streets. According to the Civic Council of Popular
and Indigenous Organizations, 800 U.S. troops participated in the
military operation.



This powerful abstention, carried
out under the most difficult conditions, shows that the overwhelming
majority of the Honduran workers and people aspire to put end to the
regime of the pro-imperialist oligarchy and to impose a National
Constituent Assembly. Accomplishing these tasks remains on the agenda,
more than ever.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 15:23

CNN) -- Voters in Honduras have elected a new president, but it remained in question Monday whether the international community would recognize conservative candidate Porfirio Lobo Sosa.
Lobo's legitimacy remains in doubt because Sunday's elections were held under the rule of interim President Roberto Micheletti, who assumed power after a June 28 coup ousted President Jose Manuel Zelaya. Many nations said before the election they would withhold recognition if Zelaya were not returned to power.
Divisions remained Monday. The United States, Colombia and Costa Rica said they would recognize Lobo. Argentina, Brazil and Spain said they would not.
Zelaya, who had called for an election boycott that apparently failed, said he would not recognize the results.
The United States on Monday urged Honduras to take the next steps toward resolving the crisis, such as having the nation's Congress vote on whether to restore Zelaya to power. That vote was one of the provisions of a pact that representatives for Zelaya and Micheletti signed in late October.
"While the election is a necessary one, it is not a sufficient one," said Arturo Valenzuela, the assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs.




Hondurans cast their votes

The Supreme Electoral Tribunal has not made the election results official, but the vote showed that opposition National Party candidate Lobo defeated Elvin Santos of the Liberal Party. Zelaya and Micheletti are Liberal Party members, and their rift splintered the party and may have hurt Santos.
Lobo vowed Monday to bring the divided nation back together.
"Nobody wins with this situation," he said in an interview with CNN affiliate Televicentro TV. "We all lose. It's unjust to maintain a polarized country."
Lobo said Monday he had not talked with Zelaya but had indicated earlier he was willing to meet with the deposed president.
Zelaya, who had been flown to Costa Rica on the day of the coup, has been staying at the Brazilian Embassy in Honduras' capital since returning secretly to the country September 21.
Asked if he would meet with Zelaya, Lobo said, "I will do all that is necessary to bring peace to Honduras."
Some analysts say Lobo has little choice, given the isolation Honduras has been under since the coup.
"Lobo Sosa will probably move to create a unity government and grant Zelaya political amnesty in order to end the political conflict following Zelaya's ouster," said Heather Berkman, an analyst for the Eurasia Group consulting firm.Nobody wins with this situation. We all lose. It's unjust to maintain a polarized country.
--Porfirio Lobo Sosa, Honduran president-elect






var cnnRelatedTopicKeys = [];

RELATED TOPICS




Lobo's victory Sunday was a political redemption. He narrowly lost the presidential election to Zelaya in November 2005, winning 46 percent of the vote.
"Four years is a short time," he said jubilantly at his victory speech early Monday.
Zelaya supporters said this year that Lobo was one of four presidential candidates who supported the coup.
Lobo, whose name means "wolf" in Spanish, has an easy and toothy smile and intense eyes. His nickname is Pepe. He turns 62 later this month, has been a member of Congress since 1990 and was its president from 2002 to 2006. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Miami.
"I am a simple type, originally from Juticalpa, Olancho," he says on his Facebook page. "I am of few words but much action. My parents inculcated in me a love for work since I was very young. I have been a cattleman, a farmer, a businessman."
In addition to the presidency, at stake in Sunday's election were three vice presidencies, 128 congressional seats and posts for mayor and other municipal seats.
The other three presidential candidates were Bernard Martinez of the Innovation and Unity Party-Social-Democracy (PINU), Felicito Avila of the Christian Democrat Party (CD) and Cesar Ham of the Democratic Unification Party (PUD).
A sixth candidate, Carlos Reyes, withdrew in early November.
The United States issued a statement Sunday, commending Honduras for the election.
"Turnout appears to have exceeded that of the last presidential election," the statement said. "This shows that given the opportunity to express themselves, the Honduran people have viewed the election as an important part of the solution to the political crisis in their country."
The United Nations, the Organization of American States, the European Union and most nations -- including the United States -- had condemned the coup over the summer and demanded that Zelaya be reinstated immediately.
It looked like a solution to the crisis had been reached October 29, when Zelaya and Micheletti agreed to a deal brokered by the United States. The pact said Congress would vote on whether to reinstate Zelaya to power after consultation with the nation's Supreme Court and other bodies. That vote is scheduled for this week.
The Supreme Court ruled last week that Zelaya could not return to office without first facing trial on charges that he acted unconstitutionally when he tried to hold a vote that could have led to the removal of presidential term limits. The Supreme Court had ruled that the vote was illegal and Congress had forbidden it.
The coup came on the day that the term-limits vote was to have been held.
Micheletti and his supporters have insisted that Zelaya's removal was a constitutional transfer of power, not a coup.
Some leaders of large Latin American countries, particularly those that have been ruled under dictatorships in recent years, are concerned that allowing the election results to stand could embolden other "adventurers" to try to stage coups.
Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner said Monday the election was "a mockery" carried out "in the most absolute illegality," the state-run Telam news agency reported.
Argentina was ruled by a right-wing dictatorship from 1976 to 1983.
Micheletti stepped down temporarily last week to try to distance himself from Sunday's elections. He said he would resume office Wednesday.
In a letter to the nation Sunday night, Micheletti congratulated Hondurans for the peaceful and substantial turnout. There were no official tallies Monday of how many Hondurans voted.
Despite fears of unrest, election day was calm and without major incident. About 35,000 police and soldiers were deployed across the country.
Amnesty International on Sunday urged Honduran authorities to reveal the identities, whereabouts and charges against all people detained over the weekend.

The new president is scheduled to be sworn in January 27.

CNN's Arthur Brice contributed to this report.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Joel
Membre-fondateur
Membre-fondateur


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 15208
Localisation : USA
Loisirs : Histoire
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le patriote

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 19:15

Pipo,

Se touse "goch" lan touse ann Ayiti ak ONDIRAS.

Yon ansyen geriya "Kastris" ,ki te konn atake bank pou leve lajan pou lit lan e ki pase 15 zan lan prizon genyen ayè eleksyon prezidansyèl lan URUGUAY.
Sa k pase lan ONDIRAS lan se yon "temporary setback".
Vag roz fonse an kontinye ap blayi sou Amerik lan:

Leftist wins Uruguay Presidential Vote

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/30/world/americas/30uruguay.html?_r=1&ref=americas
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 22:24

Se domaj ke se patout moun ki gen chans bon konviksyon. Pa gen anyen ki sipoze fè neg otantik, konsekan pèdi chemen yo. Temps pa fè moun serye pè. La jistis ap fini pa triyonfe. Nou konn ki sa problem Ayiti a ye men vrè "restavèk" yo pa vle peyi a chanje. Mwen menm mwen pat fèt esklav paske zansèt mwen yo pat aksepte viv lan kondisyon konsa. Chemen jistis la te mèt long men nou pap lage.

Se pa de ri w pa fè'm ri ak vag roz fonse a. Lan kou a, mwen komanse enkyete'm pou frè nou ki ap seye fè la paix lan mitan san manman. Kom w se rezidan USA, mwen ta renmen konen ki sa moun pense de fyabilite sekirite ke y'ap bay Obama. Neg sa yo telman jwenn fyète lan asasine prezidan yo. Malheur à ces abrutis! Eskize franse'm, je suis tellement désabusé...


Dernière édition par pierre le Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 22:29, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
kami
animatrice
animatrice
avatar

Féminin
Nombre de messages : 2981
Localisation : ICI
Opinion politique : La séparation des pouvoirs
Loisirs : Lecture, Dormir
Date d'inscription : 20/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Lun 30 Nov 2009 - 22:27

Evo ap min-nin byen an Bolivie tou? pa vre? lap voye rose, lol...

_________________
Comme toi, il n'en est qu'un, deviens donc qui tu es.

"Ceux qui ont le pouvoir de faire le mal et qui savent ne pas le faire sont des Seigneurs" (Shakespeare)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Joel
Membre-fondateur
Membre-fondateur


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 15208
Localisation : USA
Loisirs : Histoire
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le patriote

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 3:45

Kami

Ou konnen byen,nanpren jan pou yon moun tankou EVO MORALES ta ka vin prezidan Dayiti;su w ta traspoze lan milye ayisyen an.

Misye se Endyen "pure blood"
Lan Amerik di Sid ,pito w nwa ke ou Endyen.

Ann Ayiti ,konbyen koudeta ,konbyen "correction démocratique" misye t ap deja pran?
Se lontan nèg tankou RHEBU,tankou GEORGE MICHEL,mesye mwen rele poutchis pèmanan yo,t ap gen tan monte sou radyo pou di ke misye vyole konstitisyon e mande Lame an pou l kapote misye.
Ou gen dwa konte dwèt yon sèl men ,konbyen rejim dwat ki rete lan Amerik,an kontan Ayiti!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
kami
animatrice
animatrice
avatar

Féminin
Nombre de messages : 2981
Localisation : ICI
Opinion politique : La séparation des pouvoirs
Loisirs : Lecture, Dormir
Date d'inscription : 20/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 6:31

Joel,

Kisa Estime, Magloire, Duvalier avek lot ankor, tout se te "pitit pep" min ki te edike. Pa bliye ke nan eleksyon '57 se te 2 klas ki te reprezante.

The coca leaf president min non yo bay Evo Morales. An atandant li chita bwa kwaze nan palè li, iyore pwoblem dwog nan lemond. Depi Morales prezidan pwodiksyon fèy koka ak pri manje monte piwo, e, pou eleksyon kap vini an, tout planter(indien) yo pral bali yon pousantaj nan pwodiksyon yo poul ka fè eleksyon. Kanta pou ekonomi an depil monte prezidan ki sal te fè, anyin, sa selman nasyonalizasyon ki pa rezoud pwoblem ekonomi peyi-a.

Li pral pase nan eleksyon kap vini an paske majorite a se indyen parey li, e, ou paka fè konparezon sa-a ak Ayiti paske se tout kaliteklas ki te vote pou aristid, se pat yon zafe de 65% nèg kont 35% milat tankou an 1957 pa egzanp.

_________________
Comme toi, il n'en est qu'un, deviens donc qui tu es.

"Ceux qui ont le pouvoir de faire le mal et qui savent ne pas le faire sont des Seigneurs" (Shakespeare)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 9:10

kami a écrit:
Joel,

Kisa Estime, Magloire, Duvalier avek lot ankor, tout se te "pitit pep" min ki te edike. Pa bliye ke nan eleksyon '57 se te 2 klas ki te reprezante.

The coca leaf president min non yo bay Evo Morales. An atandant li chita bwa kwaze nan palè li, iyore pwoblem dwog nan lemond. Depi Morales prezidan pwodiksyon fèy koka ak pri manje monte piwo, e, pou eleksyon kap vini an, tout planter(indien) yo pral bali yon pousantaj nan pwodiksyon yo poul ka fè eleksyon. Kanta pou ekonomi an depil monte prezidan ki sal te fè, anyin, sa selman nasyonalizasyon ki pa rezoud pwoblem ekonomi peyi-a.

Li pral pase nan eleksyon kap vini an paske majorite a se indyen parey li, e, ou paka fè konparezon sa-a ak Ayiti paske se tout kaliteklas ki te vote pou aristid, se pat yon zafe de 65% nèg kont 35% milat tankou an 1957 pa egzanp.
KOTE W JWEN BAGAY SOU MORALES SA YO?BANM KOTE W JWENN LEVANGIL MANTI SA A NON?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
kami
animatrice
animatrice
avatar

Féminin
Nombre de messages : 2981
Localisation : ICI
Opinion politique : La séparation des pouvoirs
Loisirs : Lecture, Dormir
Date d'inscription : 20/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 9:36

Citation :
KOTE W JWEN BAGAY SOU MORALES SA YO?BANM KOTE W JWENN LEVANGIL MANTI SA A NON?
Si se manti yo ye poukisa-w bezwen konin sous la? Yo deja manti iyore sam ekri a moncher.

Kijan yo rele moun konsa ankor?

_________________
Comme toi, il n'en est qu'un, deviens donc qui tu es.

"Ceux qui ont le pouvoir de faire le mal et qui savent ne pas le faire sont des Seigneurs" (Shakespeare)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 13:48

kami a écrit:
Citation :
KOTE W JWEN BAGAY SOU MORALES SA YO?BANM KOTE W JWENN LEVANGIL MANTI SA A NON?
Si se manti yo ye poukisa-w bezwen konin sous la? Yo deja manti iyore sam ekri a moncher.

Kijan yo rele moun konsa ankor?

Meme si on n'est pas du meme bord(je doute que nous puissions l'etre un jour parce que tu as toujours ete contre les interets de mon pays),je ne te mets pas dans le meme panier qu'un okultis dili(pa)bon et mathusalem deza.Eux ce sont des recelez,malfektez atoufe.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 13:51

Paroles d’Evo Morales Ayma,
Président constitutionnel de l’État Plurinational de Bolivie, à Leganés
(Madrid) le 13 septembre 2009



Il est recommandé aux lecteurs d’écouter la voix d’Evo Morales et les réactions du public pendant le Discours de Leganés sur ce lien tandis qu’ils suivent en même temps, ci-après, la transcription fidèle de ses paroles :


Honorable Maire Rafaël Gómez de la ville de Leganés,
autorités de la commune, autorités du Gouvernement espagnol, chère
Ambassadrice de Bolivie en Espagne, salutations à tous nos frères
boliviens. Merci beaucoup pour votre présence et pour me recevoir sur
cette terre de Leganés, d’Espagne. Je suis surpris par la présence de
milliers et de milliers de Boliviens, Équatoriens, Uruguayens,
Vénézuéliens, Colombiens, de frères péruviens, de frères cubains, tant
de Latino-Américains réunis ce soir. Je vous remercie beaucoup pour
votre grande mobilisation, cette grande intégration en Europe de tous
les Latino-Américains. Mais je veux aussi exprimer notre respect au
peuple espagnol. Un tout grand merci pour votre présence et pour avoir
organisé cette grande rencontre de peuples du monde.


Je suis surpris, à l’écoute de l’intervention de
plusieurs sœurs et frères d’Espagne, par leur connaissance des
processus de libération en Bolivie et en Amérique Latine, surpris par
leur connaissance des transformations profondes en matière sociale,
économique et politique. Certainement que beaucoup d’entre vous qui
êtes ici savent comment nous nous sommes organisés, d’abord
syndicalement, socialement, communautairement pour changer la Bolivie
et, évidemment, pour changer l’Amérique Latine. Si nous parlons de
changement, un des changements était justement la libération des
peuples en Amérique Latine.


En Bolivie, ensemble avec la Centrale Ouvrière
Bolivienne et les différents mouvements sociaux, [ce fut] une lutte
permanente contre des modèles économiques qui faisaient un mal fou aux
Boliviens. Si nous nous rappelons de la situation des politiques mises
en œuvre pendant la république, avant la république, les peuples
indigènes originaires, quechua, aymaras, guaranis, [c’est] une lutte
permanente contre le pillage de nos ressources naturelles, une lutte
permanente pour l’égalité en ces temps entre indigènes, métis et
créoles, pour un nouveau mode de vie, d’égalité dans la dignité, mais
aussi une lutte permanente pour le respect de nos droits, le droit
surtout des peuples indigènes, le secteur le plus vilipendé de
l’histoire bolivienne et de l’histoire d’Amérique Latine. Une
résistance dure, une rébellion face à un État colonial, une rébellion
des peuples contre le pillage de nos ressources naturelles, une
rébellion permanente contre les formes de soumission. Et ces luttes -je
veux vous le dire, sœurs et des frères de Bolivie- n’ont pas été en
vaines. D’une lutte syndicale, d’une lutte sociale, d’une lutte
communale, nous sommes passés à une lutte électorale.


Je me souviens parfaitement quand je suis arrivé en
1980 au Chapare (2), quand il y avait des négociations avec des
gouvernements et que les dirigeants syndicaux, d’ex-dirigeants
syndicaux émettaient des propositions de changements structurels. La
réponse des gouvernements néolibéraux était que nous autres paysans,
indigènes, n’avions pas le droit de faire de la politique, et nos
propositions de modifications à l’ordre du jour ou au calendrier des
négociations étaient controversées parce qu’elles étaient de caractère
politique. Je me souviens qu’on nous disait -j’étais le délégué de
base- qu’ils nous disaient : ce sont des propositions politiques et on
ne s’occupe pas de ça, la politique du mouvement paysan indigène dans
la zone tropicale de Cochabamba c’est la hache et la machette,
c’est-à-dire le travail, et nous n’avions pas le droit de faire de la
politique. Sur les hauts plateaux, c’était la pelle et la pioche, la
pelle pour le travail, le pilori pour le travail aussi. Et peu à peu ce
mouvement social va rompre la peur de la politique. Quelques-uns
avaient le droit de faire de la politique et nous les majorités
ouvrières et originaires n’avions pas le droit de faire de la
politique. Quand quelque ouvrier, mineur, dans les décennies 60, 70,
80, faisait de la politique, il était accusé de communiste -nous
saluons le Parti Communiste Espagnol, le Parti Socialiste, nous saluons
les humanistes ici présents, merci beaucoup de m’avoir enseigné à
défendre la vie, nous avons eu tant de rencontres- mais je veux que
vous sachiez, sœurs et frères d’Amérique Latine, d’Europe, mouvements
sociaux de ce continent, [que] nos dirigeants syndicaux, dans ces
décennies 60, 70, étaient accusés de communistes et poursuivis. [On
fomentait] des coups d’État, des putschs militaires pour terminer avec
les dirigeants syndicaux du secteur minier. Par conséquent, la doctrine
de l’impérialisme américain était de les accuser de communistes et,
pour cette raison, des mineurs étaient massacrés dans des centres
miniers et beaucoup de frères dirigeants miniers ont échappé en
s’exilant, en Europe parfois. Je veux exprimer mon profond respect et
mon admiration pour l’accueil reçu par beaucoup de frères miniers et
paysans en fuite en Europe pour pouvoir survivre. Les gouvernements
humanistes, communistes, socialistes leur ont sûrement accordé l’asile
politique.


Est venue ensuite l’autre doctrine, qui était la lutte
contre le trafic de drogues. Je me rappelle parfaitement que, dans les
décennies 80 et 90, les dirigeants syndicaux étaient des
narcotrafiquants, autre persécution de l’Empire et [que], à partir du
11 septembre 2001, les dirigeants syndicaux [étaient] accusés de
terroristes. Quelques frères doivent sûrement se souvenir qu’on
appelait Evo Morales le Ben Laden andin, les producteurs de coca les
talibans, et avec ce prétexte, [est venue] la doctrine politique de
coca zéro, comme moyen d’expulser le mouvement paysan de la zone
productrice de coca. Tout ça pour dire -je veux qu’on me comprenne-,
que nous avons supporté des interventions permanentes, parfois de
caractère même militaire pour attaquer cette rébellion de nos peuples
en Amérique Latine. Ces luttes, qu’elles soient ouvrières ou indigènes,
ces luttes de métis, ces luttes d’intellectuels comme Marcelo Quiroga
Santa Cruz, ces luttes de pères révolutionnaires comme Luis Espinal, un
Espagnol qui a donné sa vie par les pauvres de Bolivie et, comme Luis
Espinal, ces luttes de militaires patriotes comme Germán Busch, comme
le Lieutenant-colonel Gualberto Villarroel - je vous le dis, sœurs et
frères- n’ont pas été vaines. Une lutte évidemment pacifique,
démocratique, pour arriver au gouvernement, au Palacio Quemado 3 , pour
changer, de là, les politiques économiques, les politiques sociales.


Et avec un résultat ! Je voudrais que vous écoutiez,
sœurs et frères boliviens : depuis l’année 1940, la Bolivie n’avait
jamais d’excédent fiscal, et ce jusqu’en 2005 -avant que je sois
président. Après que nous ayons nationalisé en 2006 et récupéré les
hydrocarbures, [il y a eu] en Bolivie en 2006, la première année de
notre gouvernement, un excédent fiscal. On a fini avec cet État
mendiant qui empruntait même de l’argent pour payer les étrennes en
Bolivie. L’année 2005, les réserves internationales de la Bolivie
étaient de 1.700 millions de dollars. Nous sommes allés avant-hier à la
Banque Centrale de la Bolivie signer un prêt interne, et le président
de la Banque Centrale de la Bolivie m’a informé que nous avons
maintenant 8.500 millions de réserves internationales. De 1.700 à 8.500
millions de dollars de réserves internationales ! Imaginez, sœurs et
frères, combien d’argent s’en est allé pendant les vingt années de
gouvernement néolibéral, et où il est allé, sûrement dans la poche
d’économistes, d’experts financiers en Europe, en Espagne et en
Amérique Latine. Je voudrais que vous m’aidiez à enquêter sur le
pillage de nos ressources naturelles. Combien d’argent ont perdu la
Bolivie ou l’Amérique Latine, durant les dernières années combien
argent avons-nous perdu, au détriment d’un nombre d’avantages sociaux ?
Même si ce n’est pas beaucoup, ce serait un soulagement pour beaucoup
de familles boliviennes. Maintenant nous avons des réserves, maintenant
nous avons un excédent.


On nous a dit, depuis l’année passée, qu’il y avait une
crise économique du capitalisme, une crise financière. On nous a
effrayés, on nous a induit la peur pour voir comment nous allions y
faire face. J’ai vraiment pensé, sœurs et frères, que cette crise
allait fort nous affecter. J’ai pensé qu’il n’y aurait pas d’excédent
commercial. Je voudrais vous dire, sœurs et frères boliviens, qu’au 30
juillet de cette année la balance commerciale [était] positive de trois
cent millions de dollars ! Il n’y avait jamais de balance commerciale
positive en Bolivie ! Et c’est pourquoi, sœurs et frères, je suis
acquis aux changements structurels en démocratie et, quand il y a un
certain secteur qui s’oppose, [je suis d’avis qu’]il vaut mieux les
soumettre au peuple bolivien par le referendum. Maintenant les
Boliviens et Boliviennes ont non seulement le droit d’élire leurs
autorités nationales ou départementales, ainsi que leurs autorités
municipales. Maintenant le peuple bolivien a le droit de décider par
tout referendum des politiques économiques pour le peuple bolivien. Ce
sont des referendums qu’il n’y avait jamais avant. Mais aussi, grâce à
la nouvelle Constitution politique de l’État bolivien, les Boliviens et
Boliviennes non seulement ont le droit d’élire leurs autorités
nationales, départementales, municipales ou parlementaires. Maintenant
avec le vote du même peuple, ils ont le droit de révoquer tout
président, vice-président, parlementaire, préfet ou maire qui agit mal
en son domaine, ils ont le droit de les révoquer par le vote. C’est une
démocratie profonde qui non seulement est représentative, mais aussi
participative -là où se prennent les décisions avec le vote en
conscience du peuple bolivien. Mais je voudrais vous dire, sœurs et
frères, qu’il est aussi possible de changer en Bolivie les normes, les
procédures pour administrer un État. Pour la première fois en 183
années de vie républicaine, le peuple bolivien approuve une nouvelle
Constitution. Il n’y a jamais eu cela auparavant. Seuls la classe
politique, les partis ou finalement le parti qui avait la
représentation parlementaire avaient le droit de réformer la
Constitution. Maintenant, le peuple approuve avec son vote une nouvelle
Constitution de l’État bolivien. C’est-à-dire que nous avons même
changé des constitutions.


Je voudrais vous dire, sœurs et frères, nous avons une
grande faiblesse, qui est le changement de la mentalité des
fonctionnaires publics. Quelques-uns ne comprennent pas encore ce
qu’est être fonctionnaire public. Je l’ai déjà dit, je n’ai pas besoin
de simples fonctionnaires publics, j’ai besoin de révolutionnaires au
service du peuple bolivien. On a du mal à trouver des personnes qui
sont au service du peuple. Il y a une mentalité, une mentalité
coloniale –dirais-je-, un héritage paternaliste, du patron, du pillard,
de l’exploitant, cette mentalité ne peut être changée facilement, elle
est une des faiblesses présentes encore en Bolivie. Nous commençons
toutefois à changer, malgré ces faiblesses. Ce n’est pas suffisant, la
participation des mouvements sociaux dans ces transformations profondes
sera sûrement encore importante. Il y a un moment, notre Ministre des
Affaires Étrangères me disait : « En Bolivie il y a beaucoup de
mobilisation, élections après élections, des campagnes pour des
referendums, parfois révocatoires, parfois pour approuver la nouvelle
Constitution ». Je lui ai répondu qu’auparavant c’était putsch après
putsch, que maintenant c’étaient élections après élections. Je suis
très content, même s’il y a chaque année des élections et des
referendums -mais pas de coups d’État.


Mais je voudrais vous dire aussi que, dans notre
nouvelle Constitution politique de l’État bolivien approuvé par le
peuple bolivien, il ne sera pas permis, il n’est autorisé aucune base
militaire étrangère, encore moins des Etats-Unis. Et je voudrais que
les frères d’Europe, d’Espagne me comprennent. En Amérique Latine, là
où il y a une base militaire des Etats-Unis, il y a des putschs
militaires ; la paix n’est pas garantie, la démocratie n’est pas
garantie. Et je parle d’expérience, puisque j’ai été continuellement
victime, dans la décennie 90 -de mi-80 à mi-2000-, de la présence de
militaires étrangers en armes, spécialement des Etats-Unis. C’est
heureusement terminé, grâce à la conscience du peuple bolivien. Je dois
demander aux mouvements sociaux d’Europe et du monde : aidez-nous à
mettre un terme aux bases militaires en Amérique Latine ! Tout pour la
vie, tout pour la démocratie, et tout pour une paix et une justice
sociale !


[Applaudissements nombreux] Merci beaucoup, sœurs et
frères, je crois que vous m’aimez plus en Espagne qu’en Bolivie, merci
beaucoup. Je suis sûr, sœurs et frères, que le processus de libération,
le processus de transformation profonde, non seulement en Bolivie mais
en Amérique Latine, est engagé dans une voie à sens unique. Les
processus de transformation de la démocratie ne peuvent être arrêtés en
Bolivie. Pourquoi dis-je ceci ? Vous les frères qui vivez ici, vous
devez être informés : plusieurs fois des groupes néolibéraux de la
droite fasciste, raciste, ont essayé de me sortir du gouvernement -et
je m’en souviens parfaitement. La première année de mon gouvernement,
qu’ont-ils dit ? « Pauvre petit indien, il restera trois, quatre, cinq,
six mois, il ne va pas pouvoir gouverner, et après il va s’en aller,
ils vont le sortir ». C’était en 2006. Arrive 2007, qu’ont dit ces
groupes ? « Je crois que cet Indien va rester longtemps, il faut faire
quelque chose ». 2008, en 2008 ils ont fait quelque chose. Et qu’est-ce
que c’était ? D’abord essayer de me sortir par le vote révocatoire du
peuple bolivien. J’ai accepté : allons au révocatoire ! Vous savez que
nous avons gagné les élections avec 54 %. Dans ce vote révocatoire, le
peuple bolivien nous a ratifiés avec 67 %. Comme ils ont raté leur coup
par le vote révocatoire, qu’ils n’ont pas réussi à me faire révoquer
avec la conscience du peuple, ils ont tenté l’année passée un coup
d’État civil -pas militaire. Et ici je voudrais remercier les pays
d’Europe, des défenseurs de la démocratie, UNASUR, les Nations Unies
pour leur défense de la démocratie. Ils ont raté leur coup d’État civil
préfectoral. Et voilà le grand triomphe du peuple bolivien dans le
domaine politique et constitutionnel ! Et cette année, grâce à la force
et à la conscience du peuple, nous avons approuvé la nouvelle
Constitution. Nous avons maintenant l’obligation d’appliquer et de
mettre en œuvre cette nouvelle Constitution politique de l’État
bolivien, dont quelques pays européens me disent honnêtement qu’elle
est plus avancée, dans le domaine social, au niveau des droits sociaux,
que dans n’importe quel pays d’Europe.


Y de quels droits parlons-nous ? Nous parlons non
seulement des droits individuels, nous parlons non seulement des droits
politiques : dans cette nouvelle Constitution Politique de l’État
bolivien, on respecte autant les droits collectifs que privés. Par
exemple, tous les services de base constituent des droits de l’homme ;
s’il s’agit d’un droit de l’homme, il ne peut être de négoce privé
-mais de service public.


Sœurs et frères, je peux vous en raconter pas mal de
cette nouvelle Constitution de l’État bolivien, mais je suis aussi sûr
qu’il y a quelques requêtes que nous n’avons encore pu résoudre
-spécialement du service extérieur. Je n’ai trouvé l’État bolivien
-maintenant reconnu mondialement comme l’État plurinational, où existe
une diversité d’êtres humains qui habitent sur cette terre de patrie
qu’est la Bolivie-, je ne l’ai trouvé par exemple que deux [fois] en
Espagne -à Madrid et Barcelone. Nous créons maintenant un autre
consulat à Murcie -je sais, ce n’est pas suffisant. Nous sommes en
train de discuter pour étendre les consulats dans quatre ou cinq villes
espagnoles -inclus les Iles Canaries, Tenerife ou même Majorque et
Menorca que j’ai déjà pu visiter, sœurs et frères-, pour nous occuper
d’un problème nôtre, celui des migrations et des papiers y relatifs.
Mais je voudrais aussi vous parler, sœurs et frères, au nom de
l’Ambassade en Espagne -où tous les consulats donnent des informations
grâce à la compréhension du gouvernement espagnol- de quelques thèmes
importants. Le sujet par exemple des permis de conduire est très
avancé, de même que celui d’une convention de vote réciproque
-c’est-à-dire les résidents boliviens en Espagne auront le droit de
voter aux élections municipales. Nous espérons concrétiser cela, ce
vote en Espagne, lors de cette visite.


Le thème du vote à l’étranger a été une préoccupation
permanente. Je veux que vous sachiez, sœurs et frères, qu’en 2006 nous
avons envoyé, depuis le palais, un projet de loi au Congrès National.
La Chambre des Députés a heureusement approuvé sans aucune limitation
le vote à l’étranger. Mais de 2006 à 2009 il n’a pas été approuvé au
Sénat, et vous savez d’ailleurs pourquoi ils ne l’ont pas approuvé au
Sénat : les sénateurs néolibéraux ont très peur des frères qui ont
abandonné la Bolivie à la recherche de meilleures conditions de vie. On
l’a enfin approuvé pour la première fois -mais pas autant que je
l’aurais voulu-, sous la forte pression en Bolivie et en Argentine. Je
sais qu’ici aussi on s’est mobilisé pour faire pression sur le Congrès
national en vue de l’approbation d’une loi sur le vote extérieur. Il a
été approuvé jusqu’à une certaine limite, mais c’est clair, sœurs et
frères, [viendra] un moment où des congressistes partageront les
sentiments de beaucoup de frères vivant à l’étranger. Nous ferons alors
en sorte que le vote à l’étranger ne soit pas limité. Je ne suis pas
d’accord de limiter, c’est une forme d’atteinte aux droits de l’homme,
le droit des citoyens boliviens vivant à l’étranger. Mais nous
commencerons cette année, cette année avec le vote extérieur -bien que
limité.


Sœurs et frères, il y a un moment je parlais du thème
de la migration. Je voudrais dire aux pays d’Europe et du monde,
spécialement d’Europe, aux gouvernements, que ce sera aussi un débat.
Par le passé des Européens, des Espagnols sont arrivés en Bolivie, et
nos grands-pères n’ont jamais dit qu’ils étaient illégaux. Maintenant
que les Latino-Américains viennent en Europe, ils ne peuvent pas être
déclarés illégaux, parce que tous, nous avons tous le droit d’habiter
dans n’importe quelle partie du monde -nous avons tous le droit
d’habiter dans n’importe quelle partie du monde- en respectant les lois
de chaque pays. Mais nous déclarer illégaux est une grande erreur,
c’est là où je diverge des Nations Unies. Heureusement beaucoup de pays
se joignent à nos propositions. Nous espérons que les Nations Unies
établiront bientôt des normes permettant à ces soi-disant immigrants
d’être reconnus comme personnes légales -je répète, en respectant la
législation de chaque pays -, qu’ils investissent ou qu’ils viennent
chercher des meilleures conditions de vie. Soyez-en sûrs, sœurs et
frères, ce sera une autre bataille, une autre bataille pour nos sœurs
et frères -que ce soient des Européens en Bolivie ou en Amérique
latine, ou d’autres Latino-Américains en Europe. Ils doivent être
déclarés comme des personnes légales qui vivent de leur travail, qui,
par leurs efforts, vivent pour améliorer leur situation économique et
sociale.


Il y a un autre sujet central, sœurs et frères : le
sujet de l’environnement. Il y a sûrement beaucoup de paceños 4 ici.
Imaginez-vous : le Chacaltaya 5 , notre Chacaltaya n’a plus de neige !
A Potosí, le Chorolque6 n’a plus de neige -il y a sûrement quelques
potosinos ici. Chaque jour qui passe voit se réduire le poncho blanc de
ces montagnes des hauts plateaux boliviens et du haut-plateau paceño.
Nous devons en établir la responsabilité : [ce sont] les modèles de
développement capitaliste, l’industrialisation exagérée et illimitée de
quelques pays occidentaux. Ce problème affecte toutefois [toute]
l’humanité. C’est pourquoi je voudrais vous dire que je suis arrivé à
la conclusion, à la conclusion suivante : à l’heure actuelle, dans ce
nouveau millénaire, il est plus important de défendre le droit de la
Terre Mère que le droit de l’être humain. Si nous ne défendons pas le
droit de la Terre Mère, il ne servira à rien de défendre seulement le
droit humain. Je voudrais dire aux frères humanistes, au grand nombre
de mouvements sociaux, aux groupements, intellectuels et personnalités
qui se consacrent à la défense de l’environnement, et donc de la Terre
Mère, je voudrais vous dire : unissons-nous, rejoignez-nous,
aidez-nous, présidents et gouvernements qui défendons le droit de la
Terre Mère. Défendons tous l’environnement, par conséquent le droit à
la terre, défendons la planète terre pour sauver l’humanité. Si nous ne
nous unissons pas, si nous ne nous engageons pas dans une direction, si
nous ne travaillons pas ensemble, quelle sera la situation de tout être
humain d’ici 20, 30, 50 ans ? Je veux dire, qu’il s’agisse d’un
indigène, d’un ouvrier, d’un chef d’entreprise ou d’un dirigeant de
transnationale : leur vie n’est pas sûre ! La seule façon de garantir,
de garantir notre vie d’êtres humains qui vivons sur cette planète
terre est de défendre la Terre Mère.


Il est temps d’assumer cette énorme responsabilité, et
tous nous avons cette obligation noble et sacrée de défendre
l’environnement. J’appelle les pays qualifiés d’industrialisés à
commencer à penser sérieusement à l’annulation de la dette climatique,
une dette historique qui aura fait beaucoup de tort à l’environnement.
Je pressens que nous devrons assumer, en ce millénaire, cette
responsabilité pour défendre l’humanité.


Sœurs et frères, je sais que vous venez de beaucoup de
secteurs, par différents chemins. Salutations aux frères qui viennent
nous voir de différentes villes, qui viennent nous saluer, qui viennent
tous applaudir, aux frères des îles, aux compagnons latino-américains
qui viennent partager ce moment, et aux organisateurs. Je remercie le
maire de Leganés pour nous avoir permis ce rassemblement. En ce qui me
concerne, je voudrais vous dire, frères, un grand merci à tous. A
bientôt ! Nous continuerons à travailler pour l’égalité, pour la
dignité et le bien des Boliviens et de tous les Latino-Américains, pour
leur libération qui se prépare depuis l’Amérique du Sud. Un grand
merci !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Amoph
Star
Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 599
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 15:45

SUPER !!!

An "Bolivie" gen yon lot van kap soufle !!! Bagay yo ap baskule du bon kote !!!

Evo Morales se moun "sérieux" kap lute pou anpeche kolon yo avèk akolit yo (Oligarchie ya) ponpe tout lè resours de la Bolivie.

C'était un fléau insupportable !!!

Kours pourswit sa a ki livre, se pou pèrmètr mas populèr la, benefisye de manyèr ekitabl richès peyi a.

An Ayiti, figure nou, se desizyon konsa ke Leta dwe pran (Il faut briser cette chaine de reproduction du modèle de fatalité) pou fasilite yon vrè demaraj ekonomik e sosyal. Yon sor't de redistribusyon a tou lè nivo (Mieux répartir les richesses nationales !) e Otorite yo dwe omniprezant pou asure le swivi.

Encore bravo, Evo Morales !

Amoph
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
kami
animatrice
animatrice
avatar

Féminin
Nombre de messages : 2981
Localisation : ICI
Opinion politique : La séparation des pouvoirs
Loisirs : Lecture, Dormir
Date d'inscription : 20/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 16:38

Coca leaves are not cocaine said Evo Morales
Evo Morales, the Bolivian leader, ate a coca leaf in front of delegates at the UN summit on drugs to underline his demand that the raw ingredient used to make cocaine be removed from the United Nation's list of prohibited drugs.



Bolivia's President Evo Morales shows coca leaves and other products made of coca during a news conference in Vienna, Austria Photo: AP

_________________
Comme toi, il n'en est qu'un, deviens donc qui tu es.

"Ceux qui ont le pouvoir de faire le mal et qui savent ne pas le faire sont des Seigneurs" (Shakespeare)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 20:09

CNN) -- Voters in Honduras have elected a new president, but it remained in question Monday whether the international community would recognize conservative candidate Porfirio Lobo Sosa.
Lobo's legitimacy remains in doubt because Sunday's elections were held under the rule of interim President Roberto Micheletti, who assumed power after a June 28 coup ousted President Jose Manuel Zelaya. Many nations said before the election they would withhold recognition if Zelaya were not returned to power.
Divisions remained Monday. The United States, Colombia and Costa Rica said they would recognize Lobo. Argentina, Brazil and Spain said they would not.
Zelaya, who had called for an election boycott that apparently failed, said he would not recognize the results.

The United States on Monday urged Honduras to take the next steps toward resolving the crisis, such as having the nation's Congress vote on whether to restore Zelaya to power. That vote was one of the provisions of a pact that representatives for Zelaya and Micheletti signed in late October.
"While the election is a necessary one, it is not a sufficient one," said Arturo Valenzuela, the assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs.

Video: Hondurans cast their votes The Supreme Electoral Tribunal has not made the election results official, but the vote showed that opposition National Party candidate Lobo defeated Elvin Santos of the Liberal Party. Zelaya and Micheletti are Liberal Party members, and their rift splintered the party and may have hurt Santos.

Lobo vowed Monday to bring the divided nation back together.
"Nobody wins with this situation," he said in an interview with CNN affiliate Televicentro TV. "We all lose. It's unjust to maintain a polarized country."
Lobo said Monday he had not talked with Zelaya but had indicated earlier he was willing to meet with the deposed president.
Zelaya, who had been flown to Costa Rica on the day of the coup, has been staying at the Brazilian Embassy in Honduras' capital since returning secretly to the country September 21.
Asked if he would meet with Zelaya, Lobo said, "I will do all that is necessary to bring peace to Honduras."
Some analysts say Lobo has little choice, given the isolation Honduras has been under since the coup.
"Lobo Sosa will probably move to create a unity government and grant Zelaya political amnesty in order to end the political conflict following Zelaya's ouster," said Heather Berkman, an analyst for the Eurasia Group consulting firm.
Lobo's victory Sunday was a political redemption. He narrowly lost the presidential election to Zelaya in November 2005, winning 46 percent of the vote.

"Four years is a short time," he said jubilantly at his victory speech early Monday.
Zelaya supporters said this year that Lobo was one of four presidential candidates who supported the coup.
Lobo, whose name means "wolf" in Spanish, has an easy and toothy smile and intense eyes. His nickname is Pepe. He turns 62 later this month, has been a member of Congress since 1990 and was its president from 2002 to 2006. He earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the University of Miami.
"I am a simple type, originally from Juticalpa, Olancho," he says on his Facebook page. "I am of few words but much action. My parents inculcated in me a love for work since I was very young. I have been a cattleman, a farmer, a businessman."
In addition to the presidency, at stake in Sunday's election were three vice presidencies, 128 congressional seats and posts for mayor and other municipal seats.
The other three presidential candidates were Bernard Martinez of the Innovation and Unity Party-Social-Democracy (PINU), Felicito Avila of the Christian Democrat Party (CD) and Cesar Ham of the Democratic Unification Party (PUD).
A sixth candidate, Carlos Reyes, withdrew in early November.
The United States issued a statement Sunday, commending Honduras for the election.
"Turnout appears to have exceeded that of the last presidential election," the statement said. "This shows that given the opportunity to express themselves, the Honduran people have viewed the election as an important part of the solution to the political crisis in their country."
The United Nations, the Organization of American States, the European Union and most nations -- including the United States -- had condemned the coup over the summer and demanded that Zelaya be reinstated immediately.
It looked like a solution to the crisis had been reached October 29, when Zelaya and Micheletti agreed to a deal brokered by the United States. The pact said Congress would vote on whether to reinstate Zelaya to power after consultation with the nation's Supreme Court and other bodies. That vote is scheduled for this week.
The Supreme Court ruled last week that Zelaya could not return to office without first facing trial on charges that he acted unconstitutionally when he tried to hold a vote that could have led to the removal of presidential term limits. The Supreme Court had ruled that the vote was illegal and Congress had forbidden it.
The coup came on the day that the term-limits vote was to have been held.
Micheletti and his supporters have insisted that Zelaya's removal was a constitutional transfer of power, not a coup.
Some leaders of large Latin American countries, particularly those that have been ruled under dictatorships in recent years, are concerned that allowing the election results to stand could embolden other "adventurers" to try to stage coups.
Argentinian President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner said Monday the election was "a mockery" carried out "in the most absolute illegality," the state-run Telam news agency reported.
Argentina was ruled by a right-wing dictatorship from 1976 to 1983.
Micheletti stepped down temporarily last week to try to distance himself from Sunday's elections. He said he would resume office Wednesday.
In a letter to the nation Sunday night, Micheletti congratulated Hondurans for the peaceful and substantial turnout. There were no official tallies Monday of how many Hondurans voted.
Despite fears of unrest, election day was calm and without major incident. About 35,000 police and soldiers were deployed across the country.
Amnesty International on Sunday urged Honduran authorities to reveal the identities, whereabouts and charges against all people detained over the weekend.
The new president is scheduled to be sworn in January 27.


CNN's Arthur Brice contributed to this report.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 20:16

BREVES



1er décembre 2009
Honduras : la résistance célèbre une abstention très élevée

La
résistance hondurienne célèbre le haut degré d’abstentionnisme durant
la “farce électorale”. Le Front National de Résistance Populaire au
coup d’État du Honduras, a annoncé dans un communiqué qu’il célébrera
le triomphe du peuple après avoir confirmé entre 65 et 70 %
d’abstentions pour les élections de dimanche.



Les élections organisées par le gouvernement putschiste
de Roberto Micheletti, ont pris fin avec presque 56 % de votes pour le
candidat conservateur Porfirio Lobo du Parti National.



Mais la résistance hondurienne considère que "le
triomphe est au peuple", grâce à un abstentionnisme très important
enregistré durant la journée électorale du dimanche 29 novembre.



Pour ce motif, à travers d’un communiqué des citoyens
et des citoyennes honduriennes sont invités à "célébrer l’échec de la
dictature" dans les rues de toutes les villes du pays.



Selon la Cour suprême Électoral (TSE), qui a avalisé
les élections sous le coup d’État, l’absentéisme dans les urnes a été
de 61 %.



Mais, le président légitime, Manuel Zelaya, a assuré
que dans plusieurs régions du pays l’abstentionnisme est arrivé jusqu’à
75 %.



Source : Agencia Pulsar Resistencia hondureña celebra el alto abstencionismo en “farsa electoral”


Traduction : Primitivi http://www.primitivi.org/spip.php?article120



Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 20:22

ANALYSIS: HONDURAS





Winners and losers in Honduras




<table style="width: 33px; border-collapse: collapse;" border="0" bordercolor="#ffffff" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td></td>
</tr>
<tr><td align="center">There are fears that instability could return to Honduras if a political accord is not observed [EPA]

</td>
</tr>

</table>
Al Jazeera's Will Stebbins takes stock of the winners and losers in the
wake of the Tegucigalpa-San Jose power-sharing accord which ended the
four-month Honduran constitutional crisis.

The crisis was precipitated in June when the Honduran military,
backed by the Supreme Court, led a coup against Manuel Zelaya, the
president, and ousted him from power. He was forced into exile in Costa
Rica before returning to Honduras in September.
However, Zelaya remains in internal exile, marooned inside the
Brazilian embassy in the capital Tegucigalpa. After a bold and deft
campaign to regain power, and with the prize within his grasp, he
committed a critical, strategic blunder.
Zelaya believed that it would be enough to sacrifice his social
project, and the mass movement that backed it, to convince his
political enemies to restore him to the presidency.
His representatives signed an agreement that categorically forbids
the convening of a national constituent assembly, or any other form of
popular referendum on the constitution, but without a written guarantee
of a return to power for Zelaya.
That was left up to the congress, who appear poised, in the face of US indifference, to deny him even this hollow victory.
Upcoming elections
Thomas Shannon, Washington's envoy to Latin America, has said that
the US would recognise the November 29 presidential elections, whether
Zelaya was reinstated or not. He also suggested that the deposed
president had no one but himself to blame for entrusting his fate to
the Honduran congress.
Apart from this uncharacteristic innocence in believing that the
interim government would adhere to anything but the strict letter of
the accord, Zelaya had another tragic flaw.
He had clearly come to confuse his personal drama with the fate of
the country. Sounding like France's 17th century monarch Louis XIV,
Zelaya claimed that peace would be restored to Honduras once he was
returned to power.
For the trade unions and social movements that had put their bodies
on the line in protest against the coup which removed him from power,
the story would not have ended there. Zelaya was never seen as the
embodiment of Honduran democracy, but rather as the unlikely champion
of a mass movement to reshape society, and end the monopoly on
political power held by a privileged elite.
The power-sharing accord offers very little to the movement that
formed behind the ousted president. It provides no relief from the
summary detentions, or suspension of civil liberties, to which they
have been subject. There is mention of 'deepening democracy', but much
like returning Zelaya to power, it does not include a timetable.
The clear winners
<table style="width: 33px; border-collapse: collapse;" align="right" border="0" bordercolor="#ffffff" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tr><td></td>
</tr>
<tr><td align="center">Zelaya, centre, has been in internal exile at the Brazilian embassy in Tegucigalpa [EPA] </td>
</tr>

</table>
It is the oligarchy, as the privileged elite are known, that are the
clear winners. In signing the agreement, they have effectively
eliminated the very cause of the June 28 coup, which was the spectre of
mass political mobilisation, in the form of a popular referendum, that
they feared had the potential of altering the status quo.
The accord proscribes any changes to the current political system that guarantees their hold on power.
The oligarchy may, however, be overreaching in their belief that
they do not have to pay the small price of allowing an emasculated
Zelaya to serve out the last few, symbolic months of his presidency.
What could have been a diplomatic victory for Washington, is now
looking like another example of its clumsiness, which will end up
exacerbating ideological divisions. If the agreement does collapse
there will be repercussions, and collateral damage, throughout the
region.
Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan president who from the start condemned
the negotiating track led by Costa Rican president Oscar Arias as a
trap, will be vindicated.
It will not only provide the script for the next episode of his television show, Alo Presidente, but also nurture his suspicions about the threat posed by the planned US military bases in neighbouring Colombia.
Smoldering regional war?
This will be felt most acutely along the Venezuelan-Colombian
border, where a cold war between the two countries has begun to
smoulder, with drive by shootings, and unexplained mass killings.
Inacio Lula de Silva, the Brazilian president may be faced with the
question of what to do about the lodger at his embassy in Tegucigalpa.
He has been unequivocal in his support for Zelaya, and his
government has made repeated statements about their dissatisfaction
with US efforts to restore him to power.
If the deal unravels, one unforeseen victim may be the US aircraft manufacturer, Boeing.
Brazil has been planning to renew its fleet of air force jets, and
has been reviewing competing offers from the US, France, and Sweden. It
appeared that France had won the bid, for what is a much sought after
order in difficult economic times; but after intense US lobbying, the
Boeing offer is now being reconsidered.
It will be interesting to see if Lula is sufficiently annoyed enough
by perceived US carelessness in Honduras that Brazil will end handing
the French the air force contract.




<table class="SourceTitle" width="100%" border="0" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1"> <tr> <td width="1%" nowrap="nowrap"> Source:</td>
<td> Al Jazeera
</td></tr></table>
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 20:25

vendredi 27 novembre 2009






Mascarade électorale au Honduras








On
pourra, certes, argumenter que les représentants du président
constitutionnel Manuel Zelaya ont fait preuve d’une grande ingénuité en
signant, le 30 octobre, l’accord dit de San José-Tegucigalpa avec ceux
du putschiste Roberto Micheletti, sous le regard attentif — mais
surtout la pression — du sous-secrétaire d’Etat américain pour
l’hémisphère occidental Thomas Shannon. Ainsi donc, M. Zelaya, renversé
le 28 juin, expulsé, et réfugié dans l’ambassade du Brésil (depuis le
21 septembre), après être rentré clandestinement dans son pays, serait
restitué dans sa fonction, après consultation du Congrès. Un seul
détail manquait : la date de cette consultation.

Ingénuité d’un côté — ce qui n’est pas un crime. Duplicité de
l’autre — ce qui en est un, eu égards aux derniers développements de la
situation. A la veille des élections générales du 29 novembre, le
Congrès ne s’est pas réuni, le chef d’Etat légitime est toujours reclus
dans la représentation diplomatique de Brasilia. La Cour suprême du
Honduras, qui avait appuyé le golpe, s’est prononcée sans
surprise le 26 novembre contre sa restitution. La consultation aura
lieu sous le contrôle des autorités de facto.

L’Accord stipulait également : « Pour parvenir à la
réconciliation et renforcer la démocratie, nous formerons un
gouvernement d’unité et de réconciliation nationale composé de
représentants des divers partis politiques et organisations sociales,
reconnus pour leur compétence, leur honnêteté, et leur volonté de
dialogue
(…) ». Un tel gouvernement a été constitué par le président illégitime — première anomalie — et, en signe de « réconciliation nationale », aucun membre du gouvernement de M. Zelaya n’y a été intégré.

Depuis la fin juin, le pari du régime de facto a été clair : gagner
du temps, compter sur la fatigue et le désintérêt progressif de la
« communauté internationale », puis lui vendre les élections comme
« sortie de crise », blanchissant ainsi — comme on blanchit de l’argent
sale — le coup d’Etat. Le vainqueur ne pouvant être, dans l’ordre
naturel des choses, que M. Elvin Santos (Parti libéral ) ou M. Porfirio
Lobo (Parti national), représentants du groupe de la douzaine de
familles « propriétaires » du Honduras.

Cette stratégie a pu compter, en sous-main (sinon en première
intention), sur l’aide de la secrétaire d’Etat américaine Hillary
Clinton. Le 18 novembre, au terme d’une visite à Tegucigalpa, le
sous-secrétaire d’Etat adjoint pour l’Hémisphère occidental, M. Craig
Kelly, a confirmé l’appui des Etats-Unis au processus électoral — et
donc au coup d’Etat —, ajoutant cyniquement : « Personne n’a le droit d’enlever au peuple hondurien le droit de voter et de choisir ses dirigeants. »
Tombant le masque, et dans la grande tradition des relations de
l’Empire avec son « arrière-cour », les Etats-Unis accompagnent la
politique du « fait accompli » d’un pouvoir antidémocratique,
dictatorial et répressif.

Depuis le début de la gestion du président « intérimaire »
(euphémisme en cours à Washington), on recense vingt-six personnes
assassinées, deux cent onze blessées lors des actions de répression,
sept attentats, près de deux mille détentions illégales, deux
tentatives d’enlèvement et cent quatorze prisonniers politiques accusés
de sédition.

Tandis que le président Zelaya demande le report des élections et a
incité la population à poursuivre sa résistance pacifique, jusqu’au
retour de la démocratie, plus d’une centaine de candidats se sont
retirés — la majorité appartenant au secteur anti-putschiste du Parti
libéral auquel appartient M. Zelaya. Parmi eux,
cinquante-cinq candidats députés, le maire de San Pedro Sula (deuxième
ville du pays) et la postulante à la vice-présidence, pour le Parti
libéral, une militante historique de ce parti, Mme Margarita Elvir.

Les médias opposés au coup d’Etat — Radio Globo, Radio Uno,
Radio Progreso, Gualcho, etc. — sont placés sous surveillance
constante ; Cholusa Sur a vu ses émissions interrompues. M. Micheletti
— qui a annoncé son absence du pouvoir du 26 novembre au 2 décembre —
menace de sanctions sévères les citoyens qui appellent à ne pas voter.
Les militaires rassemblent d’importantes troupes dans la capitale et
dans les grandes villes : douze mille soldats, quatorze mille policiers
et cinq mille réservistes exerceront un contrôle direct sur les bureaux
de vote et assureront « la régularité » des élections. Pour traiter des
urgences, une partie de l’hôpital central de Tegucigalpa a été
réquisitionnée.

Le Front national contre le coup d’Etat — une vaste alliance
d’organisations populaires — a appelé au boycott de ce simulacre
d’élection. L’Amérique latine, emmenée par l’Argentine, le Brésil et
les pays de l’Alliance bolivarienne pour les peuples de notre Amérique
(ALBA : Bolivie, Cuba, Equateur, Nicaragua, Venezuela, etc.), exigent
la restitution de l’ordre constitutionnel et de l’Etat de droit dans la
nation d’Amérique centrale. Ils ne reconnaîtront pas les autorités
issues d’un processus réalisé sous un régime qui a usurpé le pouvoir. A
l’instar de l’Organisation des Nations unies (ONU), de l‘Organisation
des Etats américains (OEA), du Groupe de Río et de l’ALBA, aucun
organisme multilatéral n’a accepté d’envoyer des observateurs. En
revanche, les Etats-Unis dépêcheront des membres de l’Institut national
démocrate (NDI), présidé par l’ex-secrétaire d’Etat Madeleine Albright,
et de l’Institut international républicain (IRI), que préside l’ancien
candidat à la Maison Blanche John McCain ; ces deux organismes
reçoivent des fonds du Département d’Etat. Ainsi se trouve confirmé
que, au-delà de la rhétorique permanente sur la démocratie, Washington
n’en a pas terminé avec sa politique traditionnelle d’appui aux coups
d’Etat et aux régimes autoritaires en Amérique latine. Dans cette
partie du monde, l’Etat de grâce dont jouissait le président Barack
Obama appartient déjà au passé.






Maurice Lemoine(LE MONDE DIPLOMATIQUE)


























Démocratie,
Élections,
Politique,
Violence,
Honduras
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 1 Déc 2009 - 20:51



In Elections, Honduras Defeats Chávez

By MARY ANASTASIA O'GRADY





Unless something monumental happens in the Western Hemisphere in the next 31 days, the big regional story for 2009 will be how tiny Honduras managed to beat back the colonial aspirations of its most powerful neighbors and preserve its constitution.

Yesterday's elections for president and Congress, held as scheduled and without incident, were the crowning achievement of that struggle.

National Party candidate Porfirio Lobo was the favorite to win in pre-election polls. Yet the name of the victor is almost beside the point. The completion of these elections is a national triumph in itself and a win for all people who yearn for liberty.
The fact that the U.S. has said it will recognize their legitimacy shows that this reality eventually made its way to the White House. If not Hugo Chávez's Waterloo, Honduras's stand at least marks a major setback for the Venezuelan strongman's expansionist agenda.
The losers in this drama also include Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Spain, which all did their level best to block the election. Egged on by their zeal, militants inside Honduras took to exploding small bombs around the country in the weeks leading to the vote. They hoped that terror might damp turnout and delegitimize the process. They failed. Yesterday's civic participation appeared to be at least as good as it was in the last presidential election. Some polling stations reportedly even ran short, for a time, of the indelible ink used to mark voter pinkies.

Latin socialists tried to discredit Honduran democracy as part of their effort to force the reinstatement of deposed President Manuel Zelaya. Both sides knew that if that happened the electoral process would be in jeopardy.
Mr. Zelaya had already showed his hand when he organized a mob to try to carry out a June 28 popular referendum so that he could cancel the elections and remain in office. That was unlawful, and he was arrested by order of the Supreme Court and later removed from power by Congress for violating the constitution.
It is less well-known that as president, according to an electoral-council official I interviewed in Tegucigalpa two weeks ago, Mr. Zelaya had refused to transfer the budgeted funds—as required by law—to the council for its preparatory work. In other words, he didn't want a free election.
Mr. Chávez didn't want one either. During the Zelaya government the country had become a member of Mr. Chávez's Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA), which includes Cuba, Bolivia, Ecuador and Nicaragua. If power changed hands, Honduran membership would be at risk.
Last week a government official told me that Honduran intelligence has learned that Mr. Zelaya had made preparations to welcome all the ALBA presidents to the country the night of his planned June referendum. Food for a 10,000-strong blowout celebration, the official added, was on order.

ALBA has quite a bit of clout at the Organization of American States (OAS) these days, and it hasn't been hard for Mr. Chávez to control Secretary General José Miguel Insulza. The Chilean socialist desperately wants to be re-elected to his OAS post in 2010. Only a month before Mr. Zelaya was deposed, Mr. Insulza led the effort to lift the OAS membership ban on Cuba. When Mr. Zelaya was deposed, Mr. Insulza dutifully took up his instructions sent from Caracas to quash Honduran sovereignty.
Unfortunately for him, the leftist claims that Honduras could not hold fair elections flew in the face of the facts. First, the candidates were chosen in November 2008 primaries with observers from the OAS, which judged the process to be "transparent and participative." Second, all the presidential candidates—save one from a small party on the extreme left—wanted the elections to go forward. Third, though Mr. Insulza insisted on calling the removal of Mr. Zelaya a "military coup," the military had never taken charge of the government. And finally, the independent electoral tribunal, chosen by congress before Mr. Zelaya was removed, was continuing with the steps required to fulfill its constitutional mandate to conduct the vote. In the aftermath of the elections Mr. Insulza, who insisted that the group would not recognize the results, presides over a discredited OAS.
At least the Obama administration figured out, after four months, that it had blundered. It deserves credit for realizing that elections were the best way forward, and for promising to recognize the outcome despite enormous pressure from Brazil and Venezuela. President Obama came to office intent on a foreign policy of multilateralism. Perhaps this experience will teach him that freedom does indeed have enemies.

Almost 400 foreign observers from Japan, Europe, Latin America and the U.S. traveled to Honduras for yesterday's elections. Peru, Costa Rica, Panama, the German parliament and Japan will also recognize the vote. The outpouring of international support demonstrates that Hondurans were never as alone these past five months as they thought. A good part of the world backs their desire to save their democracy from chavismo and to live in liberty.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
piporiko
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4753
Age : 47
Localisation : USA
Opinion politique : Homme de gauche,anti-imperialiste....
Loisirs : MUSIC MOVIES BOOKS
Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: L'impulsif

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mer 2 Déc 2009 - 12:42

Maximo a écrit:


In Elections, Honduras Defeats Chávez

By MARY ANASTASIA O'GRADY





Unless something monumental happens in the Western Hemisphere in the next 31 days, the big regional story for 2009 will be how tiny Honduras managed to beat back the colonial aspirations of its most powerful neighbors and preserve its constitution.

Yesterday's elections for president and Congress, held as scheduled and without incident, were the crowning achievement of that struggle.

National Party candidate Porfirio Lobo was the favorite to win in pre-election polls. Yet the name of the victor is almost beside the point. The completion of these elections is a national triumph in itself and a win for all people who yearn for liberty.
The fact that the U.S. has said it will recognize their legitimacy shows that this reality eventually made its way to the White House. If not Hugo Chávez's Waterloo, Honduras's stand at least marks a major setback for the Venezuelan strongman's expansionist agenda.
The losers in this drama also include Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Spain, which all did their level best to block the election. Egged on by their zeal, militants inside Honduras took to exploding small bombs around the country in the weeks leading to the vote. They hoped that terror might damp turnout and delegitimize the process. They failed. Yesterday's civic participation appeared to be at least as good as it was in the last presidential election. Some polling stations reportedly even ran short, for a time, of the indelible ink used to mark voter pinkies.

Latin socialists tried to discredit Honduran democracy as part of their effort to force the reinstatement of deposed President Manuel Zelaya. Both sides knew that if that happened the electoral process would be in jeopardy.
Mr. Zelaya had already showed his hand when he organized a mob to try to carry out a June 28 popular referendum so that he could cancel the elections and remain in office. That was unlawful, and he was arrested by order of the Supreme Court and later removed from power by Congress for violating the constitution.
It is less well-known that as president, according to an electoral-council official I interviewed in Tegucigalpa two weeks ago, Mr. Zelaya had refused to transfer the budgeted funds—as required by law—to the council for its preparatory work. In other words, he didn't want a free election.
Mr. Chávez didn't want one either. During the Zelaya government the country had become a member of Mr. Chávez's Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA), which includes Cuba, Bolivia, Ecuador and Nicaragua. If power changed hands, Honduran membership would be at risk.
Last week a government official told me that Honduran intelligence has learned that Mr. Zelaya had made preparations to welcome all the ALBA presidents to the country the night of his planned June referendum. Food for a 10,000-strong blowout celebration, the official added, was on order.

ALBA has quite a bit of clout at the Organization of American States (OAS) these days, and it hasn't been hard for Mr. Chávez to control Secretary General José Miguel Insulza. The Chilean socialist desperately wants to be re-elected to his OAS post in 2010. Only a month before Mr. Zelaya was deposed, Mr. Insulza led the effort to lift the OAS membership ban on Cuba. When Mr. Zelaya was deposed, Mr. Insulza dutifully took up his instructions sent from Caracas to quash Honduran sovereignty.
Unfortunately for him, the leftist claims that Honduras could not hold fair elections flew in the face of the facts. First, the candidates were chosen in November 2008 primaries with observers from the OAS, which judged the process to be "transparent and participative." Second, all the presidential candidates—save one from a small party on the extreme left—wanted the elections to go forward. Third, though Mr. Insulza insisted on calling the removal of Mr. Zelaya a "military coup," the military had never taken charge of the government. And finally, the independent electoral tribunal, chosen by congress before Mr. Zelaya was removed, was continuing with the steps required to fulfill its constitutional mandate to conduct the vote. In the aftermath of the elections Mr. Insulza, who insisted that the group would not recognize the results, presides over a discredited OAS.
At least the Obama administration figured out, after four months, that it had blundered. It deserves credit for realizing that elections were the best way forward, and for promising to recognize the outcome despite enormous pressure from Brazil and Venezuela. President Obama came to office intent on a foreign policy of multilateralism. Perhaps this experience will teach him that freedom does indeed have enemies.

Almost 400 foreign observers from Japan, Europe, Latin America and the U.S. traveled to Honduras for yesterday's elections. Peru, Costa Rica, Panama, the German parliament and Japan will also recognize the vote. The outpouring of international support demonstrates that Hondurans were never as alone these past five months as they thought. A good part of the world backs their desire to save their democracy from chavismo and to live in liberty.

MARY ANASTASIA O'GRADY
,SE PA MADANM KI BAY MANTI POU 5 NON.SA MAXI-MAUX PA DI A ,SE NAN WALL STREET JOURNAL LI SOTI.SE MADANM SA TOU KI TE BRI KOURI SOU PWOFET LA.SE YON JOUNAL KI PA KREDIBILITE YON NEW YORK TIMES OU WASHINGTON POST.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mer 2 Déc 2009 - 15:28

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Maximo
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 3182
Localisation : Haiti
Loisirs : football - Gagè
Date d'inscription : 01/08/2007

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle:

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Jeu 3 Déc 2009 - 8:06

(CNN) -- Deposed Honduran President Jose Manuel Zelaya will not be reinstated as head of state, a majority of the Honduran congress voted Wednesday.
In an hours-long process, 114 lawmakers voted in favor of a motion to keep Zelaya a political outcast. A simple majority of 65 votes in the 128-member body was required to reject his reinstatement.
In the Honduran chamber, lawmakers voted one by one and addressed the chamber as they cast their vote, making for a slow process.
Wednesday's vote was a key part of a U.S.-brokered pact that representatives for Zelaya and de facto President Roberto Micheletti signed October 29, giving Congress the power to decide Zelaya's fate, rather than negotiate it directly within the agreement.
Hondurans elected a new president, opposition candidate Porfirio Lobo Sosa, on Sunday.
At stake in Wednesday's vote was whether Zelaya would be reinstated to carry out the remainder of his term, which ends in January.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
dilibon
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 2205
Localisation : Haiti
Opinion politique : Entrepreneur
Loisirs : Plages
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2009

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Contributeur

MessageSujet: La raison du plus fort... Zeyala soti ak ke li anba vant li... tet ate...   Ven 11 Déc 2009 - 14:43

Zeyala pat janm youn demokrat! Zeyala tap checeh plizye fason pou li vyole konsittisoyn peyi li! Msie pat vle ale! Ou byen si li ta oblije ale fok se moun pa li ki pou ta toujou kontinye mennen aksyon li yo pendan le li te nan fe je sou ak PapaChav! Menm jan ak ti Tonton nan Pretoria a li pwal jwe domino nan kanpe lwen!

An nou li ansanm...

Honduran Government: Zelaya Must Leave Country as Private Citizen


Thursday , December 10, 2009 AP

Honduras' coup-installed government says ousted leader Manuel Zelaya is free to leave the country, but there's a catch: Zelaya can't go as president, and he says he won't go as anything else.And so he remained holed up Thursday in the Brazilian Embassy, where he has been staying since he slipped back into the country three months ago. If he sets foot outside the building, the leaders whoousted him have vowed to arrest him on charges of treason and abuse of
power.
They appeared to be softening their stance on Wednesday when they initially responded positively to a Mexican request seeking guarantees of Zelaya's safe passage to the airport so he could fly to Mexico as a "distinguished guest." Zelaya said he had spoken with both Mexican President Felipe Calderon and Dominican President Leonel Fernandez about meeting Honduras' president-elect Porfirio "Pepe" Lobo in a neutral site to "find a peaceful solution to the situation in the country."
Mexico sent a plane to pick up Zelaya, and more than 100 of his supporters raced to the embassy to see if he would emerge. But the government quickly said he could go only as a private citizen requesting political asylum, conditions that would bar him from any political activity and would in essence require Zelaya to concede he is no longer president. In the meantime, they diverted the Mexican flight to neighboring El Salvador.
Honduras' interim information minister, Rene Zepeda, said Thursday that the deal is off unless Zelaya accepts asylum.
"If these countries want to get Zelaya out of Honduras, they will have to do it according to the law: by giving him asylum in their territories, but without a bombastic title," Zepeda said. "If that happens, our government will accept that and they can take him immediately without any problem."
Brazil, which has argued that allowing the coup to succeed will set a terrible precedent in a region so tormented by military interventions, criticized the interim government.
"This attitude of humiliation toward President Zelaya, to want him to sign documents (saying he is not president), is something I have never seen," Foreign Minister Celso Amorim said. "It is totally unacceptable." Honduras' interim president, Roberto Micheletti, shot back that Brazil shouldn't meddle in the affairs of other countries.
"I urge the nations of the world to respect this tiny country that does not have money or oil but plenty of dignity," he said. Without naming Mexico, he said unnamed forces on Wednesday had "tried to deceive us. With lies, they wanted to surprise Honduras once again." Mexican Foreign Secretary Patricia Espinosa said Mexico was still seeking a solution, but offered no details.
"Mexico, staying faithful to its humanitarian tradition, will be available to reach out to help those people who are in a difficult situation, and this will not be the exception," Espinosa said Thursday.Lobo, meanwhile, was trying to put the crisis behind Honduras, traveling abroad in an attempt to regain international support for one of Latin America's poorest nations after five months of diplomatic and economic isolation that began with Zelaya's June 28 ouster by the military.
Lobo's term begins when Zelaya's had been scheduled to end: Jan. 27.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Thunder
Super Star
Super Star
avatar

Masculin
Nombre de messages : 4689
Localisation : Planet Earth (Milky Way Galaxy)
Loisirs : Target Practice, Sports Cars, Konpa...
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le gardien

MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   Mar 15 Déc 2009 - 2:01

Sa a se yon kou di pou ekstremis ki te konprann ke tout diktatè pral jwenn lisans pou opere san grate tèt nan Lamerik lan akòz ke pouvwa Ozetazini te chanje fizi l zepòl. Se pa sèl rèv Zelaya ki efwondre, genyen anpil moun k ap kriye nan mouchwa.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Election au Honduras   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Election au Honduras
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 2Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Election - Grande Saline: Second tour necessaire!
» Excellent billet sur le Honduras
» MON AMI ANTI ELECTION SAYO EST -IL DEVENU UN SWEET-MICKISTE OU UN MARTELLISTE ??
» Haiti's sham election shames US
» Haiti Election 2010: Media Etranjé Yo Di ke Manigat ak Martelly devan!

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti :: Haiti :: Espace Monde-
Sauter vers: