Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti
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 The audacity of the Haitian populace

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Sasaye
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Date d'inscription : 02/03/2007

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MessageSujet: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyJeu 21 Avr 2011 - 22:42

The audacity of the Haitian populace
Posted on April 20, 2011 by Joan Huguenard

Note: As current visitors to earthquake-ravaged Haiti report most of the country still looks the same – crushed buildings and tent encampments abound, we are rerunning just joan’s analysis from March 11, 2010.

To understand why Haiti was so extremely devastated by the 7.0 earthquake while Chile was actually less damaged though its quake was 500 times more powerful requires some knowledge of the history of the past 200 years.

Actually, let’s start in the 1490s when Columbus claimed for Spain an island 600 miles from Florida. The beautiful, fertile land was home to Arawaks, a quiet, contented tribe.

Fast forward a few centuries. Arawaks, who’d lasted, once enslaved, less than a decade, were replaced by continuous ranks of imported African slaves who also successively succumbed to the ignominious brutality of their keepers. Meantime, Spain gave France a third of the island, land so lush it grew more produce for Europe than all other colonies combined. Produce grown by slaves, of course. That gifted land is known as Haiti.

Trouble for colonizers began when Haitian slaves took them on in a dozen years of battle, defeating local armies, a Spanish invasion, and British and French expeditions of 60,000 each, proclaiming their independence in 1804. And the Haitians have been consistently punished for such audacity to this very day.

First, the United States, entrenched in its own slave system, refused to acknowledge the sovereignty of Haiti and placed an immediate international embargo on all trade with the fledgling country.

Second, under threat of renewed warfare, France demanded billions of dollars in reparation. Imagine former slaves being asked to compensate the French for their loss of slaves and homes! And the Haitian government did pay in full over the next 140 years.

Third, the U.S. invaded Haiti in 1914, occupied the land for nearly twenty years, treated residents as sub-humans, created an unnecessary Haitian army. At this time, 31-year-old Franklin Delano Roosevelt rewrote Haiti’s Constitution, reversing, among other protections, the policy prohibiting foreigners from owning land. Soon companies from abroad started building factories.

I remember watching years ago a film from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce touting Haiti as a most lucrative place to do business. Flourishing poinsettia plants and sandy beaches filled the screen with beauty while the commentator gushed over the abundance of willing workers and extremely low labor costs.

Because we’d rewritten the tax laws, manufacturers are not required to source any materials from the host country nor to pay any taxes to that country for their first nine years and then only a slowly rising rate.

Fourth, for nearly 30 years we supported an intensely brutal dictatorship. Dr. Jean Claude Duvalier, “Papa Doc,” formed his own private army, the Tonton Macoute. Drafted from the dregs of society, the Macoutes were given, instead of a salary, permission to extricate funds from the populace by any means they might devise.

We sent preposterous amounts of “Foreign Aid” to Haiti during the reign of Duvalier and the son he appointed to succeed him, “Baby Doc.” The populace did not get schools or health care or infrastructure. But it exploded the private wealth of Papa Doc and Baby Doc who took millions to France when he was deposed in 1986. So the people eked out a living as best they could, building shacks among the mud and sewage.

Meantime, more assembly factories hired more sweatshop labor. By the time I first went to Haiti in 1990, over 200 factories were in operation there, including one where Figgie International produced every baseball used in major league games in our country.

If you ever studied a baseball, you likely assumed it was machine-made. But each baseball is sown by hand. A woman gathers the stuffing materials and the precut leather strips (both from U.S. suppliers) and holds these together between her feet. Because stitching must be done with one continuous filament, she threads two needles and holding one in each hand, bends down to feed the filament through, then brings the needles the full length of her upward reach. One stitch completed. Bend, reach, bend, reach until half-way finished. Then the work continues from table height.

No breaks are allowed in the workday, and she’s working piecemeal under quota. If her quota isn’t fulfilled by quitting time, she won’t get paid a dime for the day’s work. On quota she gets about a dime for each ball – someday. There’s no regular payday. And to even get the job, she likely had to grant the foreman sexual favors.

Fifth, the U.S. constantly interferes with Haiti’s economics and politics. Case in point, I watched U.S.-subsidized rice delivered to a hidden dock to be sold below market value, thus sabotaging local agriculture. For years, Haitian haven’t been able to afford locally grown products. If they can afford anything. Many subsist on mudcakes. Picture grave unemployment and no governmental services, though all workers pay taxes.

Sixth when Haiti held it’s first free and fair election in 1990, the U.S. was outraged that a populist candidate got 67% of the vote when we had invested millions in the campaign of another candidate. Significant members of our government tried to convince Jean Bertrand Aristide not to accept the Presidency. They failed and he was not allowed to succeed.

Though he accomplished much with few resources, including building many schools, a medical college, substantial housing for some of the poor, a first-time medical system, he also tried to raise the minimum wage from 38 cents to a dollar per day.

So we kidnapped Aristide in 2004, sent him into exile. The medical college immediately became a military base and the people suffered even more. Then came 4 hurricanes last year. And this year, the earthquake, for starts.

Thousands of Aristide supporters, clustered around the collapsed government center under tented bedsheets and rags, have received not one bottle of water, morsel of food, or drop of medication, though tons of relief supplies have been shipped to Haiti from around the world. These folks had, and retain, the audacity to hope
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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyJeu 21 Avr 2011 - 22:53

Let my people go;let the truth be told.
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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyVen 22 Avr 2011 - 0:02

Sasaye a écrit:
The audacity of the Haitian populace
Posted on April 20, 2011 by Joan Huguenard

Note: As current visitors to earthquake-ravaged Haiti report most of the country still looks the same – crushed buildings and tent encampments abound, we are rerunning just joan’s analysis from March 11, 2010.

To understand why Haiti was so extremely devastated by the 7.0 earthquake while Chile was actually less damaged though its quake was 500 times more powerful requires some knowledge of the history of the past 200 years.

Actually, let’s start in the 1490s when Columbus claimed for Spain an island 600 miles from Florida. The beautiful, fertile land was home to Arawaks, a quiet, contented tribe.

Fast forward a few centuries. Arawaks, who’d lasted, once enslaved, less than a decade, were replaced by continuous ranks of imported African slaves who also successively succumbed to the ignominious brutality of their keepers. Meantime, Spain gave France a third of the island, land so lush it grew more produce for Europe than all other colonies combined. Produce grown by slaves, of course. That gifted land is known as Haiti.

Trouble for colonizers began when Haitian slaves took them on in a dozen years of battle, defeating local armies, a Spanish invasion, and British and French expeditions of 60,000 each, proclaiming their independence in 1804. And the Haitians have been consistently punished for such audacity to this very day.

First, the United States, entrenched in its own slave system, refused to acknowledge the sovereignty of Haiti and placed an immediate international embargo on all trade with the fledgling country.

Second, under threat of renewed warfare, France demanded billions of dollars in reparation. Imagine former slaves being asked to compensate the French for their loss of slaves and homes! And the Haitian government did pay in full over the next 140 years.

Third, the U.S. invaded Haiti in 1914, occupied the land for nearly twenty years, treated residents as sub-humans, created an unnecessary Haitian army. At this time, 31-year-old Franklin Delano Roosevelt rewrote Haiti’s Constitution, reversing, among other protections, the policy prohibiting foreigners from owning land. Soon companies from abroad started building factories.

I remember watching years ago a film from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce touting Haiti as a most lucrative place to do business. Flourishing poinsettia plants and sandy beaches filled the screen with beauty while the commentator gushed over the abundance of willing workers and extremely low labor costs.

Because we’d rewritten the tax laws, manufacturers are not required to source any materials from the host country nor to pay any taxes to that country for their first nine years and then only a slowly rising rate.

Fourth, for nearly 30 years we supported an intensely brutal dictatorship. Dr. Jean Claude Duvalier, “Papa Doc,” formed his own private army, the Tonton Macoute. Drafted from the dregs of society, the Macoutes were given, instead of a salary, permission to extricate funds from the populace by any means they might devise.

We sent preposterous amounts of “Foreign Aid” to Haiti during the reign of Duvalier and the son he appointed to succeed him, “Baby Doc.” The populace did not get schools or health care or infrastructure. But it exploded the private wealth of Papa Doc and Baby Doc who took millions to France when he was deposed in 1986. So the people eked out a living as best they could, building shacks among the mud and sewage.

Meantime, more assembly factories hired more sweatshop labor. By the time I first went to Haiti in 1990, over 200 factories were in operation there, including one where Figgie International produced every baseball used in major league games in our country.

If you ever studied a baseball, you likely assumed it was machine-made. But each baseball is sown by hand. A woman gathers the stuffing materials and the precut leather strips (both from U.S. suppliers) and holds these together between her feet. Because stitching must be done with one continuous filament, she threads two needles and holding one in each hand, bends down to feed the filament through, then brings the needles the full length of her upward reach. One stitch completed. Bend, reach, bend, reach until half-way finished. Then the work continues from table height.

No breaks are allowed in the workday, and she’s working piecemeal under quota. If her quota isn’t fulfilled by quitting time, she won’t get paid a dime for the day’s work. On quota she gets about a dime for each ball – someday. There’s no regular payday. And to even get the job, she likely had to grant the foreman sexual favors.

Fifth, the U.S. constantly interferes with Haiti’s economics and politics. Case in point, I watched U.S.-subsidized rice delivered to a hidden dock to be sold below market value, thus sabotaging local agriculture. For years, Haitian haven’t been able to afford locally grown products. If they can afford anything. Many subsist on mudcakes. Picture grave unemployment and no governmental services, though all workers pay taxes.

Sixth when Haiti held it’s first free and fair election in 1990, the U.S. was outraged that a populist candidate got 67% of the vote when we had invested millions in the campaign of another candidate. Significant members of our government tried to convince Jean Bertrand Aristide not to accept the Presidency. They failed and he was not allowed to succeed.

Though he accomplished much with few resources, including building many schools, a medical college, substantial housing for some of the poor, a first-time medical system, he also tried to raise the minimum wage from 38 cents to a dollar per day.

So we kidnapped Aristide in 2004, sent him into exile. The medical college immediately became a military base and the people suffered even more. Then came 4 hurricanes last year. And this year, the earthquake, for starts.

Thousands of Aristide supporters, clustered around the collapsed government center under tented bedsheets and rags, have received not one bottle of water, morsel of food, or drop of medication, though tons of relief supplies have been shipped to Haiti from around the world. These folks had, and retain, the audacity to hope

Pwopagann! Pa genyen anyen ki plis pase sa...
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The audacity of the Haitian populace Empty
MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyVen 22 Avr 2011 - 5:24

Pwopagann! Pa genyen anyen ki plis pase sa...

Kisa ki pwopagann lan?

SAA?
To understand why Haiti was so extremely devastated by the 7.0 earthquake while Chile was actually less damaged though its quake was 500 times more powerful requires some knowledge of the history of the past 200 years.

SAA?
Fast forward a few centuries. Arawaks, who’d lasted, once enslaved, less than a decade, were replaced by continuous ranks of imported African slaves who also successively succumbed to the ignominious brutality of their keepers. Meantime, Spain gave France a third of the island, land so lush it grew more produce for Europe than all other colonies combined. Produce grown by slaves, of course. That gifted land is known as Haiti.

SAA?
First, the United States, entrenched in its own slave system, refused to acknowledge the sovereignty of Haiti and placed an immediate international embargo on all trade with the fledgling country.

Second, under threat of renewed warfare, France demanded billions of dollars in reparation. Imagine former slaves being asked to compensate the French for their loss of slaves and homes! And the Haitian government did pay in full over the next 140 years.

Third, the U.S. invaded Haiti in 1914, occupied the land for nearly twenty years, treated residents as sub-humans, created an unnecessary Haitian army. At this time, 31-year-old Franklin Delano Roosevelt rewrote Haiti’s Constitution, reversing, among other protections, the policy prohibiting foreigners from owning land. Soon companies from abroad started building factories.


OUBYEN SAA?
I remember watching years ago a film from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce touting Haiti as a most lucrative place to do business. Flourishing poinsettia plants and sandy beaches filled the screen with beauty while the commentator gushed over the abundance of willing workers and extremely low labor costs.

Because we’d rewritten the tax laws, manufacturers are not required to source any materials from the host country nor to pay any taxes to that country for their first nine years and then only a slowly rising rate.

Fourth, for nearly 30 years we supported an intensely brutal dictatorship. Dr. Jean Claude Duvalier, “Papa Doc,” formed his own private army, the Tonton Macoute. Drafted from the dregs of society, the Macoutes were given, instead of a salary, permission to extricate funds from the populace by any means they might devise.

We sent preposterous amounts of “Foreign Aid” to Haiti during the reign of Duvalier and the son he appointed to succeed him, “Baby Doc.” The populace did not get schools or health care or infrastructure. But it exploded the private wealth of Papa Doc and Baby Doc who took millions to France when he was deposed in 1986. So the people eked out a living as best they could, building shacks among the mud and sewage.

SAYO SE MANTI?
Meantime, more assembly factories hired more sweatshop labor. By the time I first went to Haiti in 1990, over 200 factories were in operation there, including one where Figgie International produced every baseball used in major league games in our country.

If you ever studied a baseball, you likely assumed it was machine-made. But each baseball is sown by hand. A woman gathers the stuffing materials and the precut leather strips (both from U.S. suppliers) and holds these together between her feet. Because stitching must be done with one continuous filament, she threads two needles and holding one in each hand, bends down to feed the filament through, then brings the needles the full length of her upward reach. One stitch completed. Bend, reach, bend, reach until half-way finished. Then the work continues from table height.

No breaks are allowed in the workday, and she’s working piecemeal under quota. If her quota isn’t fulfilled by quitting time, she won’t get paid a dime for the day’s work. On quota she gets about a dime for each ball – someday. There’s no regular payday. And to even get the job, she likely had to grant the foreman sexual favors.


ESKE SE SAA SELMAN W GADE?
Sixth when Haiti held it’s first free and fair election in 1990, the U.S. was outraged that a populist candidate got 67% of the vote when we had invested millions in the campaign of another candidate. Significant members of our government tried to convince Jean Bertrand Aristide not to accept the Presidency. They failed and he was not allowed to succeed.

Though he accomplished much with few resources, including building many schools, a medical college, substantial housing for some of the poor, a first-time medical system, he also tried to raise the minimum wage from 38 cents to a dollar per day.

So we kidnapped Aristide in 2004, sent him into exile. The medical college immediately became a military base and the people suffered even more. Then came 4 hurricanes last year. And this year, the earthquake, for starts.

Thousands of Aristide supporters, clustered around the collapsed government center under tented bedsheets and rags, have received not one bottle of water, morsel of food, or drop of medication, though tons of relief supplies have been shipped to Haiti from around the world. These folks had, and retain, the audacity to hope



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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyVen 22 Avr 2011 - 6:12



3 BEBE soti leogane o..ansanm ...ansanm..ansanm..


- Sasaye sa a ?



Min sa se yon rezonman yon filozofi restavek ki di Ayisyen yo gin dwa iresponsab paske yo te fe yo abi .Min kite kantik pwan pwye . Yo pat fe lot esklav lontan yo abi ? Se nou ki gan monopol soufransss lan ?

Kesyon an seki diferanss ki gin antt esklav lontan yo ak restavek ke nou gin jodya kom esklav .

I say manhood !Aucun leader intello pleurnicheur n'a bati une civilisation ou engage son pays sur les voies du progres en offrant son cul aux predateurs et conquerants de son environement
.

Manhood!

Se mete grenn lan bouda ou pou chanje kondisyon de vi ke w pa rinmin pou peyi a .Sepa simin la rankinn divizyon ak la enn. Si w paka fe li seke ou pa lan plass ou .

Quand vous demandez a l'etranger d'intervenir dans un conflit interne afin de pouvoir regagner une position perdue par force ou autrement ,vous vous transformez en cette prostituee qui ne peut dire non et qui doit ouvrir ses jambes a tout venant .C'est le prix de la corruption . Maladi ou pwan se paou .Sepa bondye ki baou li .Vagabon ale lan meringue sal pwan sepa li .
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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyVen 22 Avr 2011 - 8:25

Michael Deibert, Writer

Michael Deibert is a journalist and author of Notes from the Last Testament: The Struggle for Haiti, praised by The Miami Herald as “a powerfully documented exposé” and by The San Antonio Express-News as “a compelling mix of reportage, memoir and social criticism.” His website is www.michaeldeibert.com and he can be followed at twitter.com/michaelcdeibert.


Friday, March 18, 2011
Note on Jean-Bertrand Aristide's return to Haiti
As questionable friends of Haiti such as Amy Goodman, Danny Glover and others celebrate the return to Haiti of a man as politically and personally corrupt and ruthless as any that I have ever reported on, it seems only fitting that, if they don't have the dignity or respect to do so, some foreigner should write a note of apology to the many Haitians who fell opposing the man's rancid and despotic regime, or for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

So here it goes.

On behalf of all the misguided and ignorant foreigners who still act as apologists for a man who did as much to impoverish Haiti and destroy its fragile institutions as any ruler in its history (and this is by no means a complete list), I would like to apologize

* To Marie Christine Jeune, the courageous young female Police Nationale d'Haïti (PNH) officer who had publicly criticized Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s attempts to link the police force with armed gangs and was found, raped and mutilated in March 1995

* To the thirteen people murdered in the Fort Mercredi slum in June 2001 by the forces of gang leader Felix “Don Fefe” Bien-Aimé, whom Jean-Bertrand Aristide had appointed as director of the Port-au-Prince cemetery as a reward for his loyalty

* To Brignol Lindor, the journalist murdered by the pro-Aristide Domi Nan Bwa gang in Petit-Goâve on 3 December 2001

* To Eric Pierre, the 27-year-old medical student from Jacmel, was was shot and killed while leaving the Haiti’s Faculté de Medicine in January 2003 on a day of planned anti- government demonstrations, with witnesses saying attackers fled the scene in a car with official TELECO plates and even providing license numbers

* To 25-year-old Saurel Volny, shot and killed by police during an anti-government demonstration in Gonaives in January 2003.

* To Ronald Cadet, a student activist who was shot and killed in Haiti's capital in February 2003 after being forced to live in hiding since November 2002

* To the eleven people, including Michelet Lozier, mother of five, killed by Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s security forces as they raided the Gonaives slum of Raboteau in the early morning hours of 2 October 2003

* To the fourteen people, including seventeen-year-old Josline Michel and the month old baby girl of Micheline Limay, also killed by Jean-Betrand Aristide’s security forces when they again raided Raboteau on 27 October 2003

* To Danielle Lustin, the university professor, feminist activist and expert in microfinancing murdered on 22 October 2003 and whose memorial mass at Sacre-Coeur was interrupted by a gang of young mean descending from a white pickup bearing “Officielle” license plates, who pummeled them with rocks and bottles, crying “Viv Aristide” and threatening them in the most base, misogynistic terms

* To Maxime Desulmond, the well-known student leader from Jacmel, killed when pro-Aristide gangs fired upon an anti-govenrment demonstration in Port-au-Prince on 7 January 2003

* To Leroy Joseph, Kenol St. Gilles, Yveto Morancy and the rest of the at least 27 people who were murdered and the women raped by a combination of PNH, Unite de Securite de la Garde du Palais National d’Haiti and Bale Wouze forces in Saint Marc between 11 February and 29 February 2004.

* To my dear friend James "Billy" Petit-Frere, and his brother Winston "Tupac" Jean-Bart, and all the other young men used as cannon fodder by Aristide and then abandoned to their fates or their lives extinguished (such as Roland François) when they were no longer of use

Also on behalf of we foreigners, I would like to apologize to the Haitian constitution, shredded like Lyonel Trouillot's "faded piece of cloth fought over by dogs" by Jean-Bertrand Aristide in the following manner:

* By a demobilization of the Haitian army in April 1995, which was illegal without a constitutional amendment, as the army was still enshrined in Article 263 of the Haitian constitution.

* By his violation of Article 7 of Haiti's constitution, which states that "the cult of personality is categorically forbidden. Effigies and names of living personages may not appear on the currency, stamps, seals, public buildings, streets or works of art." Jean-Bertrand Aristide placed hagiographic billboards bearing his image throughout the country, and the state television station TNH showed ceaseless homages to the president.

* By personally and directly blocking the investigation into the murder of Haiti's foremost journalist, Radio Haiti Inter owner Jean Dominique and Jean-Claude Louissaint - as attested to by the staff of Radio Haiti Inter, investigating magistrate Claudy Gassant and now-PNH chief Mario Andresol - and and by pressuring Justice Henry Kesner Noel, to sign a re-arrest warrant for Prosper Avril in April 2002, among other acts, Jean-Bertrand Aristide violated Article 60 of Haiti's constitution, which delegated firmly the independence of the executive and judicial branches of government.

* By attempting in September 2003 revive a presidential decree passed by Jean-Claude Duvalier on October 12, 1977 ("broadcast information must be precise, objective and impartial, and must come from authorized sources which are to be mentioned when broadcasting. Those who are responsible for the broadcasts have to control the programs to ensure that the information "even when it is correct ”cannot harm or alarm the population by its form, presentation or timing. The broadcast stations will provide a channel for the broadcasting of official programs, if so required by the public powers .") which was a naked assault on articles 28-1, 28-2 and 245 of Haiti's constitution, which forbids censorship and protects free speech and journalistic practices.

* To say nothing of Jean-Bertrand Aristide's arming of a generation of desperately poor street children which violated Article 268 of the Haitian constitution whereby the PNH were to be the only body with the right to distribute and circulate weapons in the country.

Haitian people, you deserve better foreign friends than those who touch your soil today with the man who victimized you so. Perhaps some day you will have the foreign friends that you deserve. Until then, I know you will persevere. You are the children of heroes, after all.

Kenbe fem,

MD
Michael Deibert
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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyVen 22 Avr 2011 - 8:52



Sa sepa anyen sa .Se trokett la .Chay la deye .Devan pouvwa li pagan moun neg sanguine sa a ansasyn sa a pap touye .Ti moun kou granmoun.Pwopagan mwin se inosan sa a pap pase .Fok li jije ansasyn an .Li tronpe moun.Li bay tropp manti.Menmsi prezidan-eli a di lap padone pou nou sa pousse pi devan.
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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptyVen 22 Avr 2011 - 9:59

Et le bal recommence.On ne doit pas ecrire la verité sinon ils vous crucifieront comme ils ont crucifié le Christ.C'est l'eternelle lutte of the haves and have not.Ceux qui ont ete deboulonnés par Aristide ne lui pardonneront jamais.Inutile de leur dire la verité.Seuls les articles ecrits par les reastaveks de l'oligarchie sont credibles.Men fout jou va jou vyen yon jou ap genyen rel ka makorel wi.Il y aura un autre Dessalines pour liberer les nouveaux esclaves haitiens des griffes des esclavagistes nègres qui empechent a 90% des pauvres d'avoir acces à la nourriture, à l'education, à la sante, au travail , a la justice, au logement et à l'eau potable.
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MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptySam 23 Avr 2011 - 15:54

Wi! ...Saa se youn nan pwopagann ke zonbi tèt nan fouk yo kontinye vle foure nan gòch moun.

Yo mèt benyen, pase krèm, abiye, mete pafen, mete vwal, pase roujalèv... tout moun ki lisid ap toujou ka rekonèt yon ti koure.

Alò ti taktik "denonse" mizè pèp lan, jis pou yo ka vini fe elòj Alibaba lavalas lan ki t ap vòlò, kraze zo, touye menm pèp saa, se yon maskarad ke moun ki pat pran ason kay Sò Ann kapab detekte fasilman.

Se pa yon kesyon de oligachi kwèdèk jan ke nou vfle fè moun konprann nan, se pito yon kesyon de lavalas se youn nan sektè ki anpeche ke kondisyon pèp sa amelyore. Yon rejim k ap: vòlò, masakre inosan, vann dwòg, ki mete chimè pou kontwole opozisyon, elatriye..., fè pati de "esklavajis" nèg yo tou.

Peyi an merite plis ke sa. Alò, zafè ti nèg ki kontinye ap badijonnen nan labou chimerik lavalas lan epi ki ap pran pòz se "pèp" ke yo ap defann. Bon! Kesyon saa bon pou poze ...kijan pou yon moun fè di y l ap defann pèp, pou se lavalas li wè pou li defann? Moun saa vrèman fè pitye...
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The audacity of the Haitian populace Empty
MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptySam 23 Avr 2011 - 16:28

Men ki jan fè pou yon moun di li ap defann pep epi li se fanatik frap FADH ak Gnbist?moun ki tap rantre legliz Saint jean Bosco pike fanm ansent, moun ki te pran izmery nan legliz sacre coeur ;moun ki tap touye malary;moun ki tap masakre moun raboteau ak site soley ?bagay saa red anpil ki bokò ki zonbifye moun sa yo?
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The audacity of the Haitian populace Empty
MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptySam 23 Avr 2011 - 16:59

Se pou w montre m ki kote ke mwen konn ap fè elòj youn nan sa ke w ekri la yo, eksepte zafè GNBist lan. Paske GNBism lan se te yon mouvman popilè ki te konbat diktati sanginè ke Alibaba lavalas lan te vle enplante nan peyi an. Se konbat ke nou te konbat moun ki kont pèp yo, moun k ap masakre, boule, kenbe pèp Site Solèy, Lasiri, Raboto, elatriye nan mizè ak dezolasyon.

Se nou menm ki kontinye ap bay chen kanson bò isit lan, men aloufa bizango an deja nan poubèl listwa menm jan ak rès sila yo ki te konn pase dwa pèp lan anba pye yo.
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Le gros roseau
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The audacity of the Haitian populace Empty
MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptySam 23 Avr 2011 - 17:43

ou se saint Pierre se pa anvan kok la chante ou gentan di ou pa konn ni Toto Constan ni Guy philippe.ni chamblain jodya aloske ou te di diferan wou menm ak nou sè ke ou pa pè di ou se fanatik neg sa yo.e mouvman GNBIST la ki te destabilise peyi ya jis nou fè yo ba nou yon papa gaga.
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The audacity of the Haitian populace Empty
MessageSujet: Re: The audacity of the Haitian populace   The audacity of the Haitian populace EmptySam 23 Avr 2011 - 18:06

Ki kote ke mwen di ke mwen pa konnen yo an laa? Mwen senpleman di ke mwen pa konn fè elòj pèsonn isi an, menm jan ke wou menm ak konpayèl wou yo abitye fè pou asasen Tabarre lan.

M ap re-ekri l pou wou ankò si w pat byen li: Mwen te yon GNBis, e mwen te konbat lavalas pa sèlman dèyè yon òdinatè, men fizikman tou. Mwen te apiye 100% mouvman rebèl 2004 yo ki te vinn vire an yon mouvman "rebèlo-militaro-pèp".

Si w te onèt, wou pa t ap wont di ke se vòl eleksyon 2000 yo ki te destabilize peyi an. Men, kòm wou pa sa, w ap toujou blame "reyaksyon" olye de "aksyon" an.
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