Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

FOROM AYITI : Tèt Ansanm Pou'n Chanje Ayiti.
 
AccueilAccueil  GalerieGalerie  PortailPortail  ÉvènementsÉvènements  PublicationsPublications  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  Connexion  

Partagez
 

 Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan

Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Joel
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 16525
Localisation : USA
Loisirs : Histoire
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le patriote

Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  Empty
MessageSujet: Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan    Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  EmptyLun 21 Oct 2019 - 8:13

http://nytimes.com/2019/10/20/world/americas/Haiti-crisis-violence.html




‘There Is No Hope’: Crisis Pushes Haiti to Brink of Collapse
Haitians say the violence and economic stagnation stemming from a clash between the president and the opposition are worse than anything they have ever experienced.


ImageProtesters last week in Les Cayes, Haiti, surrounded a vehicle that had been burned in a previous demonstration. Impassable roads have contributed to the country’s emergency.
Protesters last week in Les Cayes, Haiti, surrounded a vehicle that had been burned in a previous demonstration. Impassable roads have contributed to the country’s emergency.
By Kirk SemplePhotographs by Meridith Kohut
LÉOGÂNE, Haiti — The small hospital was down to a single day’s supply of oxygen and had to decide who would get it: the adults recovering from strokes and other ailments, or the newborns clinging to life in the neonatal ward.

Haiti’s political crisis had forced this awful dilemma — one drama of countless in a nation driven to the brink of collapse.

A struggle between President Jovenel Moïse and a surging opposition movement demanding his ouster has led to violent demonstrations and barricaded streets across the country, rendering roads impassable and creating a sprawling emergency.

Caught in the national paralysis, officials at Sainte Croix Hospital were forced to choose who might live and who might die. Fortunately, a truck carrying 40 fresh tanks of oxygen made it through at the last minute, giving the hospital a reprieve.

Sign up for The Interpreter
Subscribe for original insights, commentary and discussions on the major news stories of the week, from columnists Max Fisher and Amanda Taub.

“It was scary, really scary,” said Archdeacon Abiade Lozama of the Episcopal Church of Haiti, which owns the hospital. “Every day, things become more difficult, day after day.”

Though the country has been trapped for years in cycles of political and economic dysfunction, many Haitians say the current crisis is worse than anything they have ever experienced. Lives that were already extremely difficult, here in the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, have become even more so.

Weeks of unrest around Haiti, coupled with rampant corruption and economic malaise, have led to soaring prices, a disintegration of public services and a galloping sense of insecurity and lawlessness. At least 30 people have been killed in the demonstrations in the past few weeks, including 15 by police officers, according to the United Nations.

“There is no hope in this country,” said Stamène Molière, 27, an unemployed secretary in the southern coastal town of Les Cayes. “There’s no life anymore.”

Gas shortages are worsening by the day. Hospitals have cut services or closed entirely. Public transportation has ground to a halt. Businesses have shuttered. Most schools have been closed since early September, leaving millions of children idle. Widespread layoffs have compounded chronic poverty and hunger. Uncertainty hangs over everything.

Many Haitians with the means to flee have left or are planning to, while most who remain are simply trying to figure out where they are going to get their next meals.

Haiti was once a strategic ally for the United States, which often played a crucial role here. During the Cold War, American governments supported — albeit at times grudgingly — the authoritarian governments of François Duvalier and his son, Jean-Claude Duvalier, because of  their anti-Communist stance.

In 1994, the Clinton administration sent troops to restore Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power after his ouster as president, but 10 years later, intense pressure from the United States helped push Mr. Aristide out again.

Now, protesters are criticizing the United States for continuing to stand by Mr. Moïse. The Trump administration has urged respect for the democratic process, but has said little about the unrest in Haiti.

“If you look at Haitian history, governments are overthrown when the United States turns on them,” said Jake Johnston, a research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research.

The current crisis is a culmination of more than a year of violent protests, and the product, in part, of political acrimony that has seized the nation since Mr. Moïse, a businessman, took office in February 2017 following an electoral process that was marred by delays, allegations of voter fraud and an abysmal voter turnout.

Outrage over allegations that the government misappropriated billions of dollars meant for social development projects provided the initial impetus for the protests. But opposition leaders have sought to harness the anger to force his ouster, calling for his resignation and the formation of a transitional government.

The protests intensified in early September, at times turning violent and bringing the capital, Port-au-Prince, and other cities and towns around the country to a standstill.

Image
Confronting security forces in Port-au-Prince this month. Opposition leaders have sought to harness Haitians’ anger to force the resignation of President Jovenel Moïse.
Confronting security forces in Port-au-Prince this month. Opposition leaders have sought to harness Haitians’ anger to force the resignation of President Jovenel Moïse.
“We’re not living,” Destine Wisdeladens, 24, a motorcycle-taxi driver, said at a protest march in Port-au-Prince this month. “There is no security in the country. There’s no food. There’s no hospitals. There’s no school.”

Mr. Moïse has been defiant, saying in public comments last week that it would be “irresponsible” for him to resign. He has named a commission of politicians to explore solutions to the crisis.

Amid the current turmoil, daily routines, never a sure thing in this vulnerable country, have been thrown even more deeply into doubt.

With public transportation having ground to a halt, Alexis Fritzner, 41, a security guard making about $4 per day, walks about 10 miles each way to work at a clothing factory in Port-au-Prince. He has not been paid for more than a month, he said, yet he still goes to work for fear of being fired.

“It’s because there are no other options,” he said.

The mounting problems at Sainte Croix Hospital here in Léogâne are emblematic of the crisis. Though the town is only about 20 miles from Port-au-Prince, near-daily barricades have impeded traffic. Suppliers in the capital have been forced to close or have had trouble receiving imports, making medicine hard to get.

At least one patient at the hospital died in recent days because of a lack of crucial medicine, said the Rev. Jean Michelin St.-Louis, the hospital’s general manager.

It has been hard to wrangle fuel to run the hospital’s generators, its only power supply, he said. At times, ambulances have been blocked from crossing the barricades despite promises from protest leaders to the contrary. Some of the hospital’s staff members, including the chief surgeon, have not always been able to make it to work because of the protests.

“It’s the first time I’ve been through such a difficult experience,” Father St.-Louis, 41, said.


Lafontaine St. Fort says his leg was wounded by a police bullet during a demonstration. “The reason why I went to the protest was to make a better life for myself, and make a better country,” he said from his home in La Savane, a poor  neighborhood in   Les Cayes.
The crisis is particularly stark in Les Cayes, the most populous city in southern Haiti, which has effectively been cut off from the capital by barricades on the main road.

The city endured a total blackout for nearly two months. The power company started to mete out electricity again earlier this month, though in tiny increments — a few hours on one day, a few more on another.

The city’s public hospital shut down recently when protesters, angry over the death of one of their comrades, smashed its windows and destroyed cars in its parking lot. After the attack, the staff fled, said Herard Marc Rocky, 37, the hospital’s head of logistics.

Even before the riot, the hospital was barely functioning. For three weeks, it had been without power after running out of fuel for its generators.

Archdeacon Lozama, 39, who oversees an Episcopal parish in Les Cayes, said demonstrators forbid him from holding services on two recent Sundays. “We couldn’t open the doors,” he said. “People would burn the church.”

Thieves have stolen the batteries from solar panels that provide electricity to the parish school. The keyboardist in the church music ensemble was recently wounded by a stray bullet. And protesters manning a barricade took food that Archdeacon Lozama was delivering by truck on behalf of an international charity.

“There’s no one you can call,” he lamented. “There’s no one in charge.”

People, he said, are desperate. “As they have nothing, they can destroy everything. They have nothing to lose.”

Intersections throughout Les Cayes are scarred with the remains of burned barricades made with wood, tires and other debris, vestiges of near-daily protests.

“I’m hiding out here, I’m hunkering down, I’m not even on my porch,” said Marie Prephanie Pauldor Delicat, 67, the retired headmistress of a kindergarten in Les Cayes. “I’m scared of the people.”

Shop owners say sales have plummeted. Violent demonstrations have forced them to curtail their hours, and it has become harder to restock merchandise.

Several regional opposition leaders, in an interview at a dormant nightclub in Les Cayes, blamed infiltrators sympathetic to the government for the violence. But they defended the roadblocks, saying they helped thwart the movement of security forces accused of aggressions against residents.

“We get the support of the population despite it all, because all the population has the same demand: the departure of Jovenel Moïse,” said Anthony Cyrion, a lawyer.

ADVERTISEMENT


A wellspring of opposition in Les Cayes is La Savane, one of its most forlorn neighborhoods, where simple, rough-hewed homes line unpaved roads and the stench of open sewers commingles with the salty perfume of the Caribbean Sea.

On a visit this month, reporters from The New York Times were surrounded by crowds of desperate and angry residents, each with a list of grievances against the government and accounts of utter despair.

One young man opened his shirt to reveal a bullet wound in his shoulder. Another showed where a bullet had hit his leg. They blamed the police.

“We are all victims in many ways!” shouted Lys Isguinue, 48. “We are victims under the sticks of the police! We are victims of tear gas! We are victims because we cannot eat! We are victims because we cannot sleep!”


Image
Much activity in Haiti has ground to a halt, with shops and schools  closed, and incomes disastrously affected. Children in La Savane have been out of class since early September.
Much activity in Haiti has ground to a halt, with shops and schools  closed, and incomes disastrously affected. Children in La Savane have been out of class since early September.

Image
Venise Jules fights complete despair, and the hope that propelled her to vote for Mr. Moïse has vanished. “He said everything would change,” she recalled. “We would have food on our plates, we would have electricity 24/7, we would have jobs for our children and salaries would increase.”
Venise Jules fights complete despair, and the hope that propelled her to vote for Mr. Moïse has vanished. “He said everything would change,” she recalled. “We would have food on our plates, we would have electricity 24/7, we would have jobs for our children and salaries would increase.”
Venise Jules, 55, a cleaning woman at a grade school and the mother of Ms. Molière, the unemployed secretary, said her entire family had voted for Mr. Moïse.

ADVERTISEMENT


“He said everything would change,” she recalled. “We would have food on our plates, we would have electricity 24/7, we would have jobs for our children and salaries would increase.”

Ms. Jules, three of her five children and a cousin live in a narrow house in La Savane made from mud and stone. The corrugated metal roof leaks when it rains. The bathroom is an outhouse with a hole in the ground. With no running water, the family has to fill buckets at a public tap several blocks away.

They cook over coal — when they have something to cook.

“I didn’t put anything on the fire today,” Ms. Jules said. It had been a full day since she had eaten anything.

With the schools closed, Ms. Jules had been without work — or an income — for weeks. Even when she worked, earning $47 per month, she had not been able to amass any savings. Now she sends her children to eat at the homes of friends with something to spare.

Her despair, she said, has driven her to consider suicide.

On a recent evening, she sat with Ms. Molière, her daughter, in their house as it sank into the shadows of the night. Ms. Molière began to cry softly. Seeing her tears, Ms. Jules began to cry as well.

“It’s not only that we’re hungry for bread and water,” Ms. Molière said. “We’re hungry for the development of Haiti.”

“Haiti is very fragile,” she said.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Joel
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 16525
Localisation : USA
Loisirs : Histoire
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le patriote

Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan    Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  EmptyLun 21 Oct 2019 - 8:23

Google translate ATIK NYTIMES lan


"Il n'y a pas d'espoir": la crise pousse Haïti au bord de l'effondrement
Les Haïtiens affirment que la violence et la stagnation économique résultant d'un affrontement entre le président et l'opposition sont pires que tout ce qu'ils ont connu.


La semaine dernière, ImageProtesters aux Cayes, en Haïti, a encerclé un véhicule qui avait été incendié lors d'une manifestation antérieure. Les routes impraticables ont contribué à l’urgence du pays.
Les manifestants la semaine dernière à Les Cayes, en Haïti, ont encerclé un véhicule qui avait été incendié lors d'une manifestation précédente. Les routes impraticables ont contribué à l’urgence du pays.
Par Kirk SemplePhotographies de Meridith Kohut
LÉOGNE, Haïti - Le petit hôpital ne disposait que d’une réserve journalière d’oxygène et devait décider qui l’obtiendrait: les adultes qui se remettaient d’un AVC ou d’autres maux, ou les nouveau-nés qui vivaient dans le service néonatal.

La crise politique en Haïti a forcé ce terrible dilemme - un drame d’innombrables dans une nation au bord de la faillite.

Une lutte entre le président Jovenel Moïse et un mouvement d'opposition croissant réclamant son éviction a conduit à de violentes manifestations et à la barricadage des rues à travers le pays, rendant les routes impraticables et créant une urgence tentaculaire.

Pris dans la paralysie nationale, les responsables de l'hôpital Sainte Croix ont été contraints de choisir qui pourrait vivre et qui pourrait mourir. Heureusement, un camion transportant 40 réservoirs d'oxygène frais a réussi à traverser à la dernière minute, donnant un répit à l'hôpital.

Inscrivez-vous à l'interprète
Abonnez-vous aux chroniqueurs Max Fisher et Amanda Taub pour des idées originales, des commentaires et des discussions sur les principaux reportages de la semaine.

«C’était effrayant, vraiment effrayant», a déclaré l’archidiacre Abiade Lozama de l’Église épiscopale d’Haïti, à laquelle appartient l’hôpital. "Chaque jour, les choses deviennent plus difficiles, jour après jour."

Bien que le pays soit pris au piège depuis des années par des cycles de dysfonctionnement politique et économique, de nombreux Haïtiens disent que la crise actuelle est pire que tout ce qu'ils ont connu auparavant. Des vies déjà extrêmement difficiles, ici dans le pays le plus pauvre de l'hémisphère occidental, sont devenues encore plus difficiles.

Des semaines d'agitation autour d'Haïti, associées à une corruption généralisée et à un malaise économique, ont entraîné une flambée des prix, une désintégration des services publics et un sentiment galopant d'insécurité et d'anarchie. Selon les Nations unies, au moins 30 personnes ont été tuées au cours des manifestations, dont 15 par des policiers.

"Il n'y a pas d'espoir dans ce pays", a déclaré Stamène Molière, 27 ans, secrétaire au chômage dans la ville côtière de Les Cayes, dans le sud du pays. "Il n’ya plus de vie."

Les pénuries d'essence s'aggravent de jour en jour. Les hôpitaux ont coupé les services ou ont fermé complètement. Les transports en commun sont au point mort. Les entreprises ont fermé. La plupart des écoles sont fermées depuis début septembre, laissant des millions d'enfants inactifs. Les licenciements généralisés ont aggravé la pauvreté chronique et la faim. L'incertitude plane sur tout.

De nombreux Haïtiens ayant les moyens de fuir sont partis ou envisagent de le faire, tandis que la plupart d'entre eux essaient simplement de savoir où ils vont se procurer leur prochain repas.

Haïti était autrefois un allié stratégique des États-Unis, qui jouaient souvent un rôle crucial à cet égard. Pendant la guerre froide, les gouvernements américains ont soutenu - parfois à contrecoeur - les gouvernements autoritaires de François Duvalier et de son fils, Jean-Claude Duvalier, en raison de leur position anticommuniste.

En 1994, le gouvernement Clinton a envoyé des troupes pour rétablir Jean-Bertrand Aristide au pouvoir après son limogeage à la présidence, mais 10 ans plus tard, une pression intense exercée par les États-Unis a contribué à renvoyer à nouveau M. Aristide.

À présent, les manifestants reprochent aux États-Unis de continuer à se tenir aux côtés de M. Moïse. L’administration Trump a appelé au respect du processus démocratique, mais n’a pas beaucoup parlé des troubles en Haïti.

«Si vous regardez l'histoire haïtienne, les gouvernements sont renversés lorsque les États-Unis s'en retournent contre eux», a déclaré Jake Johnston, attaché de recherche au Center for Economic and Policy Research.

La crise actuelle est l'aboutissement de plus d'une année de violentes manifestations et résulte en partie de l'acrimonie politique qui s'empare de la nation depuis que M. Moïse, un homme d'affaires, a pris ses fonctions en février 2017 à la suite d'un processus électoral entaché. par des retards, des allégations de fraude électorale et une participation électorale catastrophique.

L'indignation suscitée par les allégations selon lesquelles le gouvernement aurait détourné des milliards de dollars destinés à des projets de développement social a donné l'impulsion initiale aux manifestations. Mais les dirigeants de l'opposition ont cherché à maîtriser la colère pour forcer son éviction, réclamant sa démission et la formation d'un gouvernement de transition.

Les manifestations se sont intensifiées début septembre, devenant parfois violentes et immobilisant la capitale, Port-au-Prince, ainsi que d'autres villes et villages du pays.

Image
Affronter les forces de sécurité à Port-au-Prince ce mois-ci. Les dirigeants de l'opposition ont cherché à exploiter

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Joel
Super Star
Super Star


Masculin
Nombre de messages : 16525
Localisation : USA
Loisirs : Histoire
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2006

Feuille de personnage
Jeu de rôle: Le patriote

Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan    Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  EmptyLun 21 Oct 2019 - 8:43

L'article du NEW YORK TIMES (SUITE)



La crise actuelle est l'aboutissement de plus d'une année de violentes manifestations et résulte en partie de l'acrimonie politique qui s'empare de la nation depuis que M. Moïse, un homme d'affaires, a pris ses fonctions en février 2017 à la suite d'un processus électoral entaché. par des retards, des allégations de fraude électorale et une participation électorale catastrophique.

L'indignation suscitée par les allégations selon lesquelles le gouvernement aurait détourné des milliards de dollars destinés à des projets de développement social a donné l'impulsion initiale aux manifestations. Mais les dirigeants de l'opposition ont cherché à maîtriser la colère pour forcer son éviction, réclamant sa démission et la formation d'un gouvernement de transition.

Les manifestations se sont intensifiées début septembre, devenant parfois violentes et immobilisant la capitale, Port-au-Prince, ainsi que d'autres villes et villages du pays.

Image
Affronter les forces de sécurité à Port-au-Prince ce mois-ci. Les dirigeants de l’opposition ont cherché à maîtriser la colère des Haïtiens pour forcer le président Jovenel Moïse à démissionner.
Affronter les forces de sécurité à Port-au-Prince ce mois-ci. Les dirigeants de l’opposition ont cherché à maîtriser la colère des Haïtiens pour forcer le président Jovenel Moïse à démissionner.
«Nous ne vivons pas», a déclaré Destine Wisdeladens, 24 ans, chauffeur de taxi-moto, lors d’une manifestation à Port-au-Prince ce mois-ci. «Il n'y a pas de sécurité dans le pays. Il n’ya pas de nourriture. Il n’ya pas d’hôpitaux. Il n’ya pas d’école.

M. Moïse a été provocant, affirmant dans des commentaires publics la semaine dernière qu'il serait "irresponsable" pour lui de démissionner. Il a nommé une commission politique chargée de rechercher des solutions à la crise.

Au milieu de la tourmente actuelle, les routines quotidiennes, qui ne sont jamais sûres dans ce pays vulnérable, ont été jetées encore plus profondément dans le doute.

Alexis Fritzner, 41 ans, agent de sécurité qui gagne environ 4 dollars par jour, parcourt une quinzaine de kilomètres pour se rendre au travail dans une usine de confection de vêtements à Port-au-Prince. Il n'a pas été payé depuis plus d'un mois, a-t-il déclaré, mais il continue néanmoins à travailler, de peur d'être licencié.

"C'est parce qu'il n'y a pas d'autres options", a-t-il déclaré.

Les problèmes croissants à l'hôpital Sainte Croix, ici à Léogâne, sont emblématiques de la crise. Bien que la ville ne soit qu'à environ 20 miles de Port-au-Prince, des barricades quasi quotidiennes empêchent la circulation. Les fournisseurs de la capitale ont été contraints de fermer ou ont eu du mal à importer, ce qui rend les médicaments difficiles à obtenir.

Au moins un patient à l'hôpital est décédé ces derniers jours en raison d'un manque de médicaments essentiels, a déclaré le révérend Jean Michelin St.-Louis, directeur général de l'hôpital.

Il a été difficile de se disputer le carburant pour faire fonctionner les générateurs de l’hôpital, sa seule source d’alimentation, a-t-il déclaré. Parfois, les ambulances ont été empêchées de traverser les barricades malgré les promesses contraires des responsables de la manifestation. Certains membres du personnel de l’hôpital, y compris le chirurgien en chef, n’ont pas toujours été en mesure de se rendre au travail à cause des manifestations.

«C’est la première fois que je vis une expérience aussi difficile», a déclaré le père St. Louis, 41 ans.


Lafontaine St. Fort affirme que sa jambe a été blessée par une balle de la police lors d'une manifestation. «La raison pour laquelle je suis allé à la manifestation était pour améliorer ma vie et pour rendre mon pays meilleur», a-t-il déclaré depuis son domicile à La Savane, un quartier pauvre des Cayes.
La crise est particulièrement grave aux Cayes, la ville la plus peuplée du sud d’Haïti, qui a été séparée de la capitale par des barricades sur la route principale.

La ville a subi une panne totale pendant près de deux mois. La compagnie d’électricité a recommencé à acheter de l’électricité plus tôt ce mois-ci, bien que de façon infime: quelques heures le jour même, quelques-unes de plus.

L’hôpital public de la ville a récemment fermé ses portes lorsque les manifestants, fâchés contre la mort de l’un de leurs camarades, ont brisé ses fenêtres et détruit des voitures sur son parking. Après l’attaque, le personnel s’est enfui, a déclaré Herard Marc Rocky, 37 ans, responsable de la logistique à l’hôpital.

Même avant l'émeute, l'hôpital fonctionnait à peine. Depuis trois semaines, il était sans électricité après avoir manqué de carburant pour ses générateurs.

L'archidiacre Lozama, 39 ans, qui supervise une paroisse épiscopale à Les Cayes, a déclaré que les manifestants lui interdisaient d'organiser des offices deux jours de dimanche. "Nous ne pouvions pas ouvrir les portes", a-t-il déclaré. "Les gens allaient brûler l'église."

Des voleurs ont volé les piles de panneaux solaires qui fournissent de l’électricité à l’école paroissiale. Le claviériste de l'ensemble de musique d'église a récemment été blessé par une balle perdue. Et les manifestants tenant une barricade ont pris de la nourriture que l'archidiacre Lozama livrait par camion au nom d'une organisation caritative internationale.

"Il n’ya personne que vous puissiez appeler", a-t-il déploré. "Il n'y a personne en charge."

Les gens, at-il dit, sont désespérés. «Comme ils n'ont rien, ils peuvent tout détruire. Ils n'ont rien a perdre."

Les intersections à travers les Cayes sont marquées par les restes de barricades brûlées en bois, pneus et autres débris, vestiges de manifestations quasi quotidiennes.

"Je me cache ici, je me recroqueville
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Contenu sponsorisé




Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan    Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan  Empty

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Denye DEPECH NYTIMES sou KRIZ lan
Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti :: Haiti :: Espace Haïti-
Sauter vers: