Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti
Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti
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 Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE

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Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE Empty
MessageSujet: Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE   Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE EmptyJeu 11 Fév 2021 - 8:10

Lan yon EDITORYAL,NEW YORK TIMES mande pou BIDEN ede AYISYEN yo debarase AYITI de JOVENEL MOISE e etabli yon GOUVENMAN TRANZISYON:


Haiti Needs Help. This Is What the U.S. Sends Instead.
Our neighbor is in a constitutional crisis, and instead of carrying aid, planes arrived with deportees.

By The Editorial Board
The editorial board is a group of opinion journalists whose views are informed by expertise, research, debate and certain longstanding values. It is separate from the newsroom.

Feb. 10, 2021


Months of often violent protests against Haiti’s President Jovenel Moïse have repeatedly brought life to a halt in the capital, Port-au-Prince.
Months of often violent protests against Haiti’s President Jovenel Moïse have repeatedly brought life to a halt in the capital, Port-au-Prince.Credit...Valerie Baeriswyl/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
Sunday should have been a day of celebration in Haiti. It marked the 35th anniversary of the fall of the Duvalier dictatorship, and the last day in office of the despised President Jovenel Moïse. Instead, it was another day from hell.

Rather than leave office, Mr. Moïse claimed that he had foiled a coup. He sent troops in the middle of the night to round up a judge, a senior police officer and more than 20 others. The fragmented opposition, in the meantime, compounded the crisis by installing two presidents — a Supreme Court judge who had been fired by Mr. Moïse and a lawyer in Haiti’s north.

For the long-suffering Haitians, the power struggle promised only more bloodshed and chaos. They have already been battered by recent hurricanes, an earthquake and a cholera epidemic introduced, in a cruel irony, by United Nations peacekeeping forces. Few countries have endured so much, and no others that lie within a few hundred miles of the richest nation on earth.

A plane arrived from the United States on Monday. But instead of help or hope, it carried several dozen Haitians, including a 2-month-old and 21 other children, deported by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. President Biden had ordered a 100-day moratorium on such deportations, but a Texas judge temporarily blocked the order, prompting the agency to defy the administration’s wishes and accelerate deportations. More such flights to Haiti are expected through the week.

Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, has not had much respite from corruption and chaos in the 35 years since democracy was restored. But Mr. Moïse is widely blamed for making lives that were already very difficult, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic, even worse through rampant plunder and mismanagement.

Months of often violent protests against Mr. Moïse have repeatedly brought life in the capital, Port-au-Prince, and other cities and towns to a halt. Fuel shortages are routine, hospitals have cut services or have closed, public transportation has ground to a halt, and businesses have shuttered. The rapid spread of kidnapping for ransom by well-organized gangs has forced schools to close for fear of students and teachers being captured.


ImageMr. Moïse is widely blamed for making life in Haiti worse through rampant plunder and mismanagement.
Mr. Moïse is widely blamed for making life in Haiti worse through rampant plunder and mismanagement.Credit...Jean Marc Herve Abeland/EPA, via Shutterstock
The constitutional crisis has centered on a dispute over when Mr. Moïse’s term should end. The constitutional term is five years, and Mr. Moïse was elected in 2015 and should have been installed in February 2016. But election monitors deemed that election too corrupt to stand, and a caretaker government remained in office until another election was held a year later. It was hardly fairer, but Mr. Moïse took office on Feb. 7, 2017. He insists that his five years expire in 2022.

The reality is that Mr. Moïse has effectively has lost all popular support and abandoned any pretense of democratic rule. He has ruled by decree since last year, when he suspended two-thirds of the Senate, the entire lower chamber and every mayor across Haiti. He has refused to hold any elections for four years, so there are only 11 elected representatives in office for 11 million people. He is seeking to expand his powers through a referendum on the Constitution set for April.

Haitians tend to look to their powerful northern neighbor for guidance in times of unrest, but the signals they’ve received have been mixed. The Trump administration backed Mr. Moïse, mainly because he supported a campaign to oust President Nicolás Maduro in Venezuela. On Friday a State Department spokesman, Ned Price, concurred with Mr. Moïse’s argument that he has another year to go, adding that “the Haitian people deserve the opportunity to elect their leaders and restore Haiti’s democratic institutions.” The Organization of American States and the United Nations took similar positions.

Several members of the U.S. Senate and House urged the State Department to reject Mr. Moïse’s efforts to stay in power, and on Monday a State Department spokesman said, “The situation remains murky.”

That it does. Mr. Moïse must go, but ousting him or trying to hold elections when the courts, the legislature and security forces are in disarray and violence rules the streets could make matters worse. Haiti’s history shows that a government in the hands of a contentious opposition might not be a major improvement. When a country comes as close to collapse as Haiti has, it is very difficult to restore order and effective governance.

One suggested solution is for outside powers — some combination of the United States, the O.A.S., the U.N. and the European Union — to organize a council of civil society leaders, along with representatives of churches, farmers and other groups, who can form a transitional government and prepare for new elections.


The Biden administration should promptly order a review of what is happening there and how the United States and its allies can assist in finding a path forward.

But first, the new administration needs to find a way to halt Immigration and Customs Enforcement deportations to Haiti — which are in defiance of the Biden administration’s directives. At the very least, the United States should stop contributing to its close neighbor’s distress.
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MessageSujet: Re: Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE   Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE EmptyLun 15 Fév 2021 - 14:43

Biden accused Trump of ignoring Haiti. As turmoil deepens, will he change US policy?
BY JACQUELINE CHARLES
FEBRUARY 14, 2021 07:00 AM, UPDATED 9 MINUTES AGO
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Duration 4:14Fullscreen
Haiti's deteriorating human rights problem
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Jacques Letang, president of the Haitian Bar Federation and founding member of the Human Rights Office in Haiti addressed the U.N. Security Council in June on the deteriorating human rights situation in Haiti. BY UN WEB TV

As Haiti descended into violent anti-government street clashes last fall, then-U.S. presidential contender Joe Biden, fresh off a campaign visit to Little Haiti, took to Twitter to slam Donald Trump.

“The Trump Administration is abandoning the Haitian people while the country’s political crisis is paralyzing that nation,” Biden wrote. “As president, I would press for dialogue to prevent further violence and instability.”

Now as Haiti’s political turmoil deepens, the nation’s crisis is quickly becoming one of his administration’s first foreign policy tests. There are worrying signs that President Jovenel Moïse is becoming Latin America and the Caribbean’s newest strongman. He has been ruling by decree for over a year after dismissing most of the legislature and issued a number of executive orders strengthening his powers as president. Opponents say his term expired on Feb. 7. He disagrees.

TOP ARTICLES
FIU tells employees to return to campus, saying the university’s success depends on it
Since then, Moïse’s government has jailed 23 people, accusing them of plotting a coup. He’s also fired three Supreme Court justices named by the opposition as potential replacements. And he’s appointed three magistrates to the high court in a move experts say is illegal and designed to pack the judiciary with loyalists. He also named a new head of public security, jailed for his involvement in a 2005 police-involved massacre at a U.S.-funded soccer match in a poor Port-au-Prince neighborhood.

Late Saturday, following public outcry, the nomination was revoked and Moïse named instead a current Haiti National Police inspector with military experience to the job.

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The Biden administration has stated it supports Moïse’s claim that his term expires in 2022 and called on Haiti to hold new legislative elections and ensure a peaceful transfer of power when the president’s time in office ends. But thus far there have been few changes from the Trump administration’s policies. Planeloads of Haitian deportees continue to arrive in Port-au-Prince. Official remarks still skirt around addressing broader concerns about human rights and rising fears of authoritarianism. No high-level visit has been announced, something former diplomats believe could help break the impasse if the right person is sent.

READ NEXT
AMERICAS
Biden promises a new era with Latin America and the Caribbean. How much can he really do?
JANUARY 14, 2021 7:00 AM
In Haiti and in the diaspora, some are looking to the U.S., which has long played a role in the nation’s politics, to take a stronger stance.

“During Biden’s visit to Little Haiti on Oct. 5, 2020, he promised he would work to bring his support to the Haitian community,” said Ancelyn-Glinaud Vilbert, 25, a resident of Cap-Haïtien who was among those who felt compelled to seek out Biden’s October 23, 2020 tweet and offer up a fresh response.
“We are headed into a dictatorship,” Vilbert said in an interview. “The United States of America must stop supporting these acts.”

A State Department spokesperson told the Miami Herald that the Biden administration will push for accountability for current and former Haitian government officials involved in human rights abuses and corruption, including through individual sanctions.

“President Biden has been very clear that we will put democracy and human rights back at the center of American foreign policy,” the spokesperson said. “The U.S. government has criticized a number of actions President Moïse and his administration have taken, and we will continue to press for the prompt organization of overdue legislative elections.”

MOUNTING FEARS OVER ABUSE OF POWER
The constitutional crisis currently plaguing the Caribbean nation is part of a larger battle over governance and who is in charge. Moïse wants to introduce a new constitution. He has described the country’s current Magna Carta — written after the fall of the Duvalier dictatorship 35 years ago this Feb. 7 — as “an act of corruption.”


The constitution, he said, is a roadblock to governing because it requires the president to seek approval from parliament for many decisions, including the appointment of a prime minister, who is then tasked with executing the programs.

In the proposed overhaul, there would be a unicameral legislature, eliminating the Senate, and the new parliament would be elected every five years to match the term of the president, whose powers would be strengthened.

Thousands march in Haiti to say ‘No to dictatorship’ as peaceful protest turned violent
FEBRUARY 14, 2021 8:12 PM
While the current constitution doesn’t allow two consecutive presidential terms, the draft is silent on it and only states that a president cannot serve more than two terms— leaving the door open for Moïse, 52, to run again.

The proposed overhaul, which has the support of the United Nations, is being viewed by some as unconstitutional and a power grab by Moïse because the current constitution forbids referendums and requires any changes to go through parliament.


Biden accused Trump of ignoring Haiti. As turmoil deepens, will he change US policy?
BY JACQUELINE CHARLES
FEBRUARY 14, 2021 07:00 AM, UPDATED 9 MINUTES AGO
PlaySkip Back
Skip Forward
Mute
CaptionsCurrent Time 0:00
/
Duration 4:14Fullscreen
Haiti's deteriorating human rights problem
SHARE
Jacques Letang, president of the Haitian Bar Federation and founding member of the Human Rights Office in Haiti addressed the U.N. Security Council in June on the deteriorating human rights situation in Haiti. BY UN WEB TV

As Haiti descended into violent anti-government street clashes last fall, then-U.S. presidential contender Joe Biden, fresh off a campaign visit to Little Haiti, took to Twitter to slam Donald Trump.

“The Trump Administration is abandoning the Haitian people while the country’s political crisis is paralyzing that nation,” Biden wrote. “As president, I would press for dialogue to prevent further violence and instability.”

Now as Haiti’s political turmoil deepens, the nation’s crisis is quickly becoming one of his administration’s first foreign policy tests. There are worrying signs that President Jovenel Moïse is becoming Latin America and the Caribbean’s newest strongman. He has been ruling by decree for over a year after dismissing most of the legislature and issued a number of executive orders strengthening his powers as president. Opponents say his term expired on Feb. 7. He disagrees.

TOP ARTICLES
FIU tells employees to return to campus, saying the university’s success depends on it
Since then, Moïse’s government has jailed 23 people, accusing them of plotting a coup. He’s also fired three Supreme Court justices named by the opposition as potential replacements. And he’s appointed three magistrates to the high court in a move experts say is illegal and designed to pack the judiciary with loyalists. He also named a new head of public security, jailed for his involvement in a 2005 police-involved massacre at a U.S.-funded soccer match in a poor Port-au-Prince neighborhood.

Late Saturday, following public outcry, the nomination was revoked and Moïse named instead a current Haiti National Police inspector with military experience to the job.

The Biden administration has stated it supports Moïse’s claim that his term expires in 2022 and called on Haiti to hold new legislative elections and ensure a peaceful transfer of power when the president’s time in office ends. But thus far there have been few changes from the Trump administration’s policies. Planeloads of Haitian deportees continue to arrive in Port-au-Prince. Official remarks still skirt around addressing broader concerns about human rights and rising fears of authoritarianism. No high-level visit has been announced, something former diplomats believe could help break the impasse if the right person is sent.

READ NEXT
AMERICAS
Biden promises a new era with Latin America and the Caribbean. How much can he really do?
JANUARY 14, 2021 7:00 AM
In Haiti and in the diaspora, some are looking to the U.S., which has long played a role in the nation’s politics, to take a stronger stance.

“During Biden’s visit to Little Haiti on Oct. 5, 2020, he promised he would work to bring his support to the Haitian community,” said Ancelyn-Glinaud Vilbert, 25, a resident of Cap-Haïtien who was among those who felt compelled to seek out Biden’s October 23, 2020 tweet and offer up a fresh response.

“We are headed into a dictatorship,” Vilbert said in an interview. “The United States of America must stop supporting these acts.”

A State Department spokesperson told the Miami Herald that the Biden administration will push for accountability for current and former Haitian government officials involved in human rights abuses and corruption, including through individual sanctions.

“President Biden has been very clear that we will put democracy and human rights back at the center of American foreign policy,” the spokesperson said. “The U.S. government has criticized a number of actions President Moïse and his administration have taken, and we will continue to press for the prompt organization of overdue legislative elections.”

MOUNTING FEARS OVER ABUSE OF POWER
The constitutional crisis currently plaguing the Caribbean nation is part of a larger battle over governance and who is in charge. Moïse wants to introduce a new constitution. He has described the country’s current Magna Carta — written after the fall of the Duvalier dictatorship 35 years ago this Feb. 7 — as “an act of corruption.”


The constitution, he said, is a roadblock to governing because it requires the president to seek approval from parliament for many decisions, including the appointment of a prime minister, who is then tasked with executing the programs.

In the proposed overhaul, there would be a unicameral legislature, eliminating the Senate, and the new parliament would be elected every five years to match the term of the president, whose powers would be strengthened.

READ NEXT
HAITI
Thousands march in Haiti to say ‘No to dictatorship’ as peaceful protest turned violent
FEBRUARY 14, 2021 8:12 PM
While the current constitution doesn’t allow two consecutive presidential terms, the draft is silent on it and only states that a president cannot serve more than two terms— leaving the door open for Moïse, 52, to run again.

The proposed overhaul, which has the support of the United Nations, is being viewed by some as unconstitutional and a power grab by Moïse because the current constitution forbids referendums and requires any changes to go through parliament.


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Joel
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MessageSujet: Re: Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE   Lan yon EDITORYAL-NEW YORK TIMES mande BIDEN pou l kwape JOVENEL MOISE EmptyJeu 18 Fév 2021 - 0:34



Maxine Waters demande à Biden d’appliquer la loi Magnitsky contre les fonctionnaires du régime de facto de Jovenel Moïse
By Rezo Nodwes -17 février 20210183


Mercredi 17 février 2021 ((rezonodwes.com))–

Maxine Waters Représentant du 43e district du Congrès de Californie depuis 1991, dans un éditorial publié par le quotidien Miami Herald ce 17 février, qualifie le coup d’Etat de Jovenel Moïse du 7 février , d’attaque honteuse contre la démocratie .



Les États-Unis peuvent se conformer à l’interdiction de la loi Leahy relativement au soutien financier aux forces de sécurité impliquées dans des violations des droits humains et appliquer les sanctions de la loi Global Magnitsky à tout fonctionnaire de l’administration Moïse impliqué dans des violations des droits humains ou dans la corruption , écrit la CongressWoman.

La réponse de l’administration Biden à la crise politique en spirale d’Haïti peut être motivée par la méfiance à l’idée d’enchevêtrer les États-Unis. dans les affaires d’un voisin, ou en ajoutant un autre défi à l’assiette extrêmement pleine de l’administration. Mais le président haïtien Jovenel Moïse semble prendre la réponse comme un feu vert pour continuer son assaut contre la démocratie.

L’assaut aggrave la crise pour les Haïtiens et menace d’engager les États-Unis dans une crise beaucoup plus grave.

En avril 2019, j’ai rencontré en Haïti les victimes du massacre de La Saline en novembre 2018, une attaque de gangs, de policiers et de responsables gouvernementaux visant à punir le quartier pour avoir organisé des manifestations anti-gouvernementales. À mon retour, j’ai averti l’administration Trump, qui a fourni un généreux soutien financier, diplomatique et politique au président Moïse, que s’il n’y avait pas de responsabilité pour les dizaines de meurtres à La Saline, Haïti sombrerait dans une spirale de chaos et de violence.

Au cours des deux années suivantes, l’administration Trump a continué de se tenir aux côtés du président Moïse alors qu’il démantelait la démocratie haïtienne et encourageait le chaos et la violence que j’avais craint. Avec le soutien des États-Unis, Moïse a refusé de négocier de bonne foi avec les opposants. Les mandats ont expiré pour la plupart des législateurs en janvier 2020 et pour tous les responsables locaux en juillet, sans élections pour leurs remplaçants. Les gangs alliés au gouvernement ont créé une alliance officielle et ont systématiquement mené des attaques meurtrières contre les quartiers de l’opposition, souvent avec le soutien de la police. La police a rencontré des manifestations pacifiques avec des gaz lacrymogènes, des gourdins et des balles. Des dissidents et des journalistes ont été arrêtés et tués. Le président Moïse a créé une agence nationale de renseignement inconstitutionnelle pour espionner les opposants.

Le président Moïse dit maintenant vouloir des élections, mais seulement après un référendum constitutionnel, prévu pour avril. Le référendum est la prise de pouvoir la plus audacieuse et la plus dangereuse de Moïse à ce jour. Les changements qu’il a proposés à la Constitution élimineraient complètement le Sénat, remplaceraient le Premier ministre semi-indépendant par un vice-président et permettraient à Moïse de choisir un conseil électoral qui organiserait les deux prochaines élections présidentielles.

Ce référendum est aussi inconstitutionnel en Haïti qu’il le serait aux États-Unis. Deux ans avant l’adoption de la Constitution actuelle en 1987, le célèbre dictateur Jean-Claude «Baby Doc» Duvalier, avait organisé un référendum similaire qui l’avait proclamé Président à vie. En réponse, la nouvelle Constitution a explicitement interdit les référendums et a établi une procédure intentionnellement difficile pour les amendements qui exige des super-majorités au sein de la législature, comme les États-Unis. La Constitution le fait. Le référendum du président Moïse est plus subtil que celui de Duvalier, mais il est tout aussi autocratique.

La crise d’Haïti s’est aggravée le 7 février, date à laquelle le président Moïse a pris fin, selon une grande partie de la société civile haïtienne, y compris l’organe de contrôle judiciaire, le barreau, les chefs d’Église et des milliers de personnes dans la rue. Ils sont rejoints par plusieurs de mes collègues démocrates aux États-Unis. Chambre des représentants et États-Unis Président du Sénat Pro Tempore Patrick Leahy. Le président Moïse, pour sa part, affirme qu’il a encore une année en fonction. Le 5 février, le département d’État a annoncé qu’il était d’accord avec lui.

L’administration Moïse a apparemment pris cette annonce comme une assurance que la politique de soutien quasi inconditionnel de l’administration Trump se poursuivrait sous le président Biden. Avant le lever du soleil le 7 février, la police a arrêté – illégalement – le juge de la Cour suprême Yvickel Dabresil et dix-neuf autres dissidents présumés. Les manifestations ce jour-là et le lendemain ont été rapidement étouffées par les gaz lacrymogènes de la police, la brutalité et les balles.

Le 8 février, Moïse a limogé le juge Dabresil et deux collègues de la Cour suprême. Cette décision était tout aussi illégale qu’elle le serait aux États-Unis et laissait la cour à court du quorum requis pour les décisions sur des questions constitutionnelles.

Les Etats Unis par l’intermédiaire de l’ambassade a exprimé sa préoccupation au sujet des licenciements des juges, mais ce léger reproche n’aura aucun effet. Le 10 février, la police et les soldats ont retourné leurs armes et leurs lance-gaz lacrymogènes vers des journalistes, blessant plusieurs d’entre eux. Le juge Dabresil a été emprisonné pendant cinq jours, avant d’être libéré après que deux tribunaux ont jugé son arrestation illégale.

Tous les signes indiquent que l’Administration Moïse continue de démanteler la démocratie haïtienne. Cela finira par présenter les États-Unis avec une crise de réfugiés et un onglet coûteux pour aider à reconstruire le pays.

L’Administration Biden peut prendre plusieurs mesures pratiques et peu coûteuses pour aider à résoudre la crise d’Haïti sans risquer de s’enchevêtrer. Il peut commencer par reconnaître le large consensus en Haïti – reflété sur la colline du Capitole – que le mandat du président Moïse a pris fin, ce qui le forcera à négocier de bonne foi avec ses adversaires.

Deuxièmement, les États-Unis peuvent déclarer qu’elle ne soutiendra pas le référendum inconstitutionnel, que ce soit directement ou par l’intermédiaire d’autres organisations telles que les Nations Unies ou l’Organisation des États américains.

Enfin, les États-Unis peuvent se conformer à l’interdiction de la loi Leahy relativement au soutien financier aux forces de sécurité impliquées dans des violations des droits humains et appliquer les sanctions de la loi Global Magnitsky à tout fonctionnaire de l’administration Moïse impliqué dans des violations des droits humains ou dans la corruption.

Maxine Waters est aux États-Unis Représentant du 43e district du Congrès de Californie depuis 1991.

Source : https://amp.miamiherald.com/opinion/op-ed/article249296735.html?__twitter_impression=true

''Le temps d'une transition démocratique en Haïti est arrivé'', écrivent des parlementaires américains au patron du Département d'État, Anthony Blinken
6 février 2021
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