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 Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents

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piporiko
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Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

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MessageSujet: Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents   Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents EmptyLun 23 Mar 2009 - 12:41

Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents
http://allafrica.com/stories/printable/200903220001.html

Washington, DC — Liberians living in the United States under 'temporary
protected status' will be allowed to stay for another year, according to an
executive order signed by President Barack Obama on Friday.

Some 3,600 Liberians living in the United States - out of an estimated 250,000
- are affected by the decision.

"I am pleased that the President has acted to preserve their status here,
preventing a grave injustice," said Rep. Patrick J. Kennedy (Democrat – Rhode
Island) in a statement after being informed of the decision by the White House.
He said Liberians in the United States, including up to 15,000 in Rhode Island,
"have contributed to our society for more than a decade, becoming active
members of our communities and providing for their families."

Also welcoming the move was Rhode Island's senior senator, Jack Reed
(Democrat): "This extension will prevent thousands of Liberians from being
separated from their families and deported back to a country still rife with
economic, social and political tensions."

The Temporary Protected Status (TPS) program was established in 1990 to allow
nationals of countries at war to stay in the United States without fear of
deportation. Those registered under TPS are allowed to work and required to pay
taxes, but they cannot qualify for benefits such as welfare or food stamps.

Throughout the 1990s, during ongoing unrest in Liberia, the U.S. government
extended TPS every year. Continuing instability prompted the Clinton and Bush
administrations to defer deportations annually for three more years until TPS
was formally reinstated in October 2002 after full-scale fighting resumed
throughout Liberia. The most recent 18-month extension, signed by President
George W. Bush in October 2007, was due to expire on March 31.

Kennedy said the latest extension "allows us to continue the fight for a path
to permanent citizenship for Liberians still living on TPS."

****************************************************

Liberians in New York ‘Jubilant’ at Expulsion Reprieve By KIRK SEMPLE, The
New York Times, March 22, 2009
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/22/nyregion/22liberians.html?ref=world



Liberian immigrants in New York celebrated the news on Saturday that President
Obama had granted a temporary reprieve to some who were facing the possibility
of expulsion at the end of the month.

Mr. Obama signed an order on Friday extending by 12 months a policy that grants
Liberians the temporary right to live and work in the United States, an
administration official said.

The policy was to expire on March 31, presenting the Liberians with a stark
choice: Uproot themselves and return to Liberia, which remains politically and
economically unstable, or stay in the United States illegally and risk
deportation.

“People are jubilant, people are happy,” said Jacob D. Massaquoi II,
executive director of African Refuge, a community organization on Staten Island
that helps Liberian refugees.

Special residency and employment rights for Liberians were first granted in
1991 as civil war tore apart their country. Thousands fled their homeland and
moved to the United States. A particularly large number settled on Staten
Island, where many went to schools and colleges, married, had children, started
businesses and bought property.

The program was extended or renewed several times. But after the end of the
civil war in 2003, and elections in 2005, the United States government decided
it was time to lift the special allowance, known as Temporary Protected Status.
In 2007, President George W. Bush granted an 18-month extension, which federal
officials said would be the last one.

But in recent months, civic leaders in the Liberian-American community asked
Mr. Obama, who has sole authority in the matter, to extend the program once
more. They argued that the alternative could divide families and rupture
communities.

“It would have a huge impact,” said Jennifer Gray-Brumskine, vice
chairwoman of the Staten Island Liberian Community Association. “Separating
families would create a new post-traumatic syndrome.”

The consequences, the advocates said, would also be acutely felt in Liberia.
The unemployment rate there is about 85 percent, and many people there depend
on money sent by Liberians in the United States to survive.

Now that the community has been granted another reprieve, its leaders say they
will press Congress to provide Liberian exiles with an expedited path to
citizenship.

But their campaign will most likely run up against strong opposition,
particularly from groups seeking tighter restrictions on immigration.

Roy Beck, executive director of NumbersUSA, a public policy group that seeks to
reduce immigration, said that Temporary Protected Status was intended to
provide relief to populations during acute emergencies.

In an e-mail message, he said that any “heart-tugging personal stories of
separation” were “the unavoidable trade-off for having accepted America’s
hospitality for so long.”

According to the Department of Homeland Security, about 3,500 Liberians were
registered under the program in 2007.

Liberian community leaders say that the refugee population is far larger — in
the tens of thousands, by some estimates — but that most either never
registered or failed to maintain their registration, and are therefore in the
country illegally.

An Obama administration official said on Saturday that Liberian exiles who were
not registered in 2007 would not be eligible to register under the new
extension.

Some Liberians, mindful of the impending deadline, filed applications in recent
months for a change of immigration status that would allow them to remain in
the country legally on various grounds when the current policy expires.

But in interviews on Staten Island this month, it was apparent that many, if
not most, Liberian exiles there had decided to stay regardless of whether Mr.
Obama postponed the deadline, resigning themselves to staying under the radar
of immigration officials.

Among them is Madeline, a home health aide who has been living in the United
States since the early 1990s and spoke on the condition that neither her
surname nor her age be published for fear of alerting the immigration
authorities.

She said that she had no intention of moving back to Liberia, and that her
family there supported her decision.

“I’m going to run away and hide somewhere,” she said. “Even my
relatives are saying, ‘We’re going to pray for you.’ They’re depending
on me.”
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Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents   Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents EmptyLun 23 Mar 2009 - 13:54

Barack entelijan vre, lap prepare opinion yan pou lè siyen papie pou 30,000 ayisien yo pou sa pa fè lobèy.
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MessageSujet: Re: Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents   Liberia: Obama Signs One-Year Extension for 'Temporary' U.S. Residents EmptyLun 23 Mar 2009 - 19:55

map mande tet mwen konbyen fwa li pral blije fè bagay saa?lane pwochenn sa ki ap rive?e lot sitoyen lot peyi yo sa li pral fè ak yo ;Bon lotrejou la yap montre ke mexico se peyi ki pose plis danje pou Eta zuni koulyè ya eske se pa yon diskriminatyon si Obama retounen Meksiken yo lakay yo. eske li ka fè sa tou ;sil fè sa konbyen meksiken ki PRAL TRAVERSE RIO GRANDE POU YO RANTRE O zETA zUNI?eske se pa solutyon Ronald reagan lan ki te pi ekitab?ba tout moun amnesty.Men ki jan li pral ba yo travay kote ke Florida to chomaj la a 10%,an kalifornie moun ak MBA ap delivre pizza.
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