Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti
Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti
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Forum Haiti : Des Idées et des Débats sur l'Avenir d'Haiti

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 Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor:

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piporiko
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Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

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Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: Empty
MessageSujet: Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor:   Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: EmptyVen 24 Avr 2009 - 10:59

Time to Deal with Haiti

Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009
Editor: Emira Woods and Emily Schwartz Greco

<table width="600" cellpadding="5"><tr><td>Foreign Policy In Focus</td>
<td>
</td></tr></table>Web location:
http://fpif. org/fpiftxt/ 6062
<table width="620" border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="0"><tr><td>When President Barack Obama went to
Trinidad for the Summit of Americas, he brought the promise of "change"
to a Latin America policy that has brought suffering to our neighbors
while reducing U.S. influence and moral standing in the hemisphere.
Change would be especially welcome to Haitians, who have suffered their
usual unfair share of political and economic instability from these
policies. But Haitians are still waiting to see whether the promised
change will extend beyond ending the illegal and destructive policies
of the last eight years, and include a shift away from U.S. policies
that have failed both our oldest neighbor and our highest ideals for
over two centuries.



Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced a
down-payment on the promise of change shortly before the summit.
Speaking at the Haiti Donors' Conference at the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB) in Washington, Clinton pledged $50 million in
aid to Haiti, including $20 million to cover Haiti's expected 2009 debt
service to the IDB and the World Bank. The debt relief measure rights a
longstanding wrong: Over half of the loans Haiti is repaying were given
to prop up dictators friendly to the U.S. but brutal to their citizens.
Until recently, Haiti was repaying these loans at a clip of $1 million
a week, diverting funds from urgent priorities like health care,
education, and economic development.



This money isn't in the bank yet. The aid package
needs congressional approval, and if Haiti is unable to jump through
all the hoops of the World Bank's debt relief program by June, its debt
service this year will increase. But the announcement itself is a
welcome departure from the Bush administration's policies.



Bush's Approach

In 2001, the Bush administration imposed a
development assistance embargo on Haiti because it didn't like the
economic policies of Haiti's democratically elected government. The
embargo stopped urgently needed government programs — a Partners In
Health study found that canceling IDB water projects in just one city
(Port de Paix) had a devastating impact on health in the area. In 2004,
U.S. officials forced President Jean-Bertrand Aristide aboard a
clandestine flight to Africa and placed a Bush supporter from Florida
at the head of Haiti's government. Thousands were killed in the ensuing
political violence. Years of hard-won progress toward democracy were
erased overnight.



But U.S. mistreatment of Haiti started much
earlier. As soon as Haiti became independent in 1804, we refused to
even recognize the new republic run by former slaves who fought to
emancipate their island. In 1915, the United States invaded Haiti to
ensure repayment of a debt to the First National Bank of New York (now
Citibank) and stayed until 1934 — this was the longest Marine
occupation ever in the Americas. Democrats and Republicans propped up
ruthless dictators in the name of fighting communism. In the 1980s, the
United States decimated Haiti's agricultural base by forcing subsidized
U.S. rice on Haitian markets.



These policies failed Haitians terribly. They cost
thousands of lives lost in political violence. Millions more suffered
because Haiti's governments couldn't or wouldn't provide clean water
and basic healthcare. The policies have also failed the United States
by requiring us to mount expensive military interventions, respond to
repeated waves of refugees, and deal with the drugs that transit easily
through an underdeveloped Haiti on their way from South America.



Haitians' hopes for better treatment from the
United States are grounded not just in Obama's promise, but in their
own country's brief but successful experiment with democracy from 1994
to 2004, and in the strategic U.S. policies that contributed to that
success.



Haiti's democratic interlude showed that democracy
does work, even in difficult situations. The period did have contested
elections and the government struggled to provide basic justice,
education, and health care — the predictable challenges of a poor,
emerging democracy. But that interlude also included Haiti's first
transfer of power from one elected president to another in February
1996, and the second successful transition in February 2001. Democratic
progress included extending AIDS retroviral therapy to rural areas that
had never before had a simple clinic. It included two historic trials
that brought powerful figures from Haiti's former army and current
police force to justice, showing the power and potential of an
independent judiciary.



These successes were due, in part, to U.S.
government efforts. U.S. troops intervened to restore the
constitutional government in 1994. USAID helped craft Haiti's
successful application for financing from the Global Fund to Fight
AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. U.S. judges, prosecutors and police
officers trained their Haitian counterparts, and also brought basic
legal resources and materials into Haitian courts.



Historic Opportunity

Obama now has a historic opportunity to build a
stronger, more prosperous Haiti. "Shovel-ready" policies could make an
immediate impact. The Obama administration could grant Haiti's request
for Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, a special immigration status
that allows visitors from fragile countries to remain in the United
States and work after their visas have expired. This would allow the
30,000 Haitians with final deportation orders to stay here and send
money home to their relatives in Haiti. Obama could facilitate
Aristide's return — he's still exiled in South Africa and remains the
country's most popular political figure, hastening the return of
normalcy to Haitian politics.



In the long run, the United States will need to
persistently invest in Haiti's democracy. Money is notoriously short
these days, but Haiti's small scale makes it a relative bargain: Three
days' spending in Iraq or two weeks' interest on the U.S. bank bailout
could fund Haiti's entire government for a year. Prudent, depoliticized
investments in Haiti's democracy will yield dividends of prosperity and
stability to Haiti, and will save U.S. taxpayer dollars in the long run
by reducing the flow of refugees and drugs to our shores. Perhaps most
importantly, by helping rebuild a better Haiti, the United States can
recover our lost prestige and influence and demonstrate to all of Latin
America that we are ready to be a good neighbor.





Paul Farmer, MD, is Presley professor of social medicine at Harvard Medical School and a co-founder of Partners In Health; Brian Concannon Jr. is director of the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti. They are Foreign Policy In Focus contributors.


</td></tr></table>
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piporiko
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Date d'inscription : 21/08/2006

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Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: Empty
MessageSujet: reponse de LUCAS   Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: EmptyVen 24 Avr 2009 - 11:00

Time to Deal with Haiti by Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon - Stanley Lucas' response
Paul Farmer raised many good points in his article
about US policy toward Haiti. The case for extending TPS has also been
made by Haitian organizations in the US. The extension of TPS, I
believe, would ultimately go a long way toward helping the Haitian
economy as Diaspora send almost $2 billion a year to their family and
friends in country.

The Obama Administration does have an
opportunity to change and improve policy toward Haiti. Secretary
Clinton has clearly been at the forefront of that effort. She and her
husband have been strong supporters of Haiti over the years. A
persistent investment in democracy in the country is also a strong
recommendation. As we witnessed with the senatorial elections over the
weekend, the democratic process in Haiti are still rife with political
intimidation, violence and corruption. People remain afraid to vote --
and have become wary of the process. It needs a credibility boost.

Fundamentally,
though, US policy in Haiti should be oriented toward promoting economic
development in the country. Education needs a lift. Haiti needs to
attract its Diaspora back to the country so that there is a pool of
experience professionals to contribute to growth. Haiti needs support
developing the agricultural sector, and on and on. These are the most
fundamental priorities.

What I find strange this article,
however, is the characterization of former President Aristide
records. Aristide, a former dictator, is facing corruption charges. The
Haitian Government Accounting Office investigated corruption on behalf
of Aristide and found that he absconded with about $350 million from
the government coffers during nine years. Brian Concannon omitted
mentioning that he worked as a lobbyists for Aristide earning thousands
of dollars according to the records of U.S. Department of Justice,
click here for more details:
http://www.haitipol icy.org/Lobbying 7.htm
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Joel
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Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor:   Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: EmptyVen 24 Avr 2009 - 18:01

Pwoblèm Stanley Lucas genyen,sè ke apa ti sèk Repibliken zanmi l yo ,misye se yon nonm ki diskredite pami lòt milye ameriken yo.

Yo di tout kalite bagay sou mosye ,ke misye te sou pewòl MICHEL FRANCOIS pandan premye koudeta a,ke se misye ki te anpeche GNBis yo ki ta ka fè yon akò ak ARISTIDE pou yo te fè l.
Se sa anbasadè ameriken an BRIAN DEAN CURRAN di;kididonk misye se pi gran responsab san ki koule yo.
Men tou nou gen dwa konprann ,misye ap chache pwoteje dengonn li.
Gade lan ki traka zanmi Repibliken misye yo ye ak zafè "tòti" an
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Rodlam Sans Malice
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Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor:   Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: EmptyVen 24 Avr 2009 - 23:43

First of all between Paul Farmer and Stanley Lucas who is more credible?Who is worthy of the confidence of the poor haitians ?I know Aristide is not a saint ,but somebody should teach Stanley Lucas the definition of the word dictator:did he criticize Prime Minister Latortue when the latter revoked the judges of the court of cassation which is similar to the Supreme court of the United states.?Did he call Latortue a dictator when the attorney general of the latortue's cabinet arrested two Senators in a radio station?did he complain when the police and the forces of the minustah killed the poors in the slums of Cite soley?


Isn't it time that Stanley Lucas allows the justice system to condemn Aristide for the crimes alleged par the GNBist and their allies.To say that Aristide is a dictator is a non sense. I never know a govenrment when the press was so free in haiti.When anybody has the right to criticize the government.I am wondering where was Stanley Lucas when there was a real dictator in haiti?

Some people think by lying all the time they will finally be credible.Isn't it a disgrace and a shame that an American doctor has more charity and compassion for the poor haitians than the members of the so called haitian elite.Stanley shame on you.
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Joel
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Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: Empty
MessageSujet: Re: Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor:   Time to Deal with Haiti Paul Farmer and Brian Concannon | April 21, 2009 Editor: EmptySam 25 Avr 2009 - 8:04

Malis,
You are being overly generous to this fascist ,by comparing him to Dr Farmer.
Stanley Lucas is now radioactive.Maybe ,he wants to pull a fast one like Dick Cheney by continuing to criticize Aristide.

He better shut his mouth or he will start or rather continuing to behave like the proverbial man with the shovel in hands ,who wants to get out of a hole but he continues digging
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